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timberdelf

Advice on machinery for moving timber

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Little compacts can be pricier than bigger stuff, if you’re not transporting it in a trailer buy a bigger 45hp plus one with forks.

 

 

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My EX50 Kioti only weights very little over 2000kg(but possibly/probably without the Kioti loader) and needs about a 500kg counterweight to be stable when maxxing out the loaders 1800kg lift capacity.

That is it will lift 2 full straps of dense masonary concrete blocks.

But would still be 3500kg towable when so configured.(& Certainly so with a sub 500kg counterweight)

And being cabless can enter low roofed buildings.

The only downside is the single speed PTO.

 

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16 hours ago, woody paul said:

Get your self a piece of paper and write down what you can do with a telehandler and then a tractor with loader. You will not have the lift capacity with tractor but from what you say only got small lumps to move. 

Cheap telehandler will be a heap of sh.. 

BUT we love old pieces of shit- on here ! K

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perfect and just the right size.

It’s certainly been a good help just needs a weight block on the back as the grab has been made heavy but still lifts a good weight. Just need to take the loader off and put on the snow blade and gritter on next week so earns its keep all year round
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If you are looking for a loader tractor, industrial tractors are well worth considering. They have much more hydraulic flow than an agricultural version, are no more complicated, have a nice easy to use joystick for the loader- and they are cheap! This one cost me £1700 and to get a normal tractor with this loading power would be far more than that! 

the downside? No  3pl or spools on mine, but some do! Your budget would let you be a little bit more selective.

 

an old backhoe like an mf50 could be had on your budget, forks on the front, some kind of grab where a back bucket would be? Not something I have any experience with but the look like a lot of machine for the money?IMG_20181028_162427.thumb.jpg.75791588f2eaec6266181b5d97f4109b.jpg

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IMG_1814.jpgour two wood moving machines, if your telehandler is cheap it will be a pile of junk, digger and a thumb are great both in the yard and work.

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I have Kubota STV40 compact tractor with front loader.

The bucket is great for moving logs, woodchip, and good sized bits of timber.

I bought a cheap 3 point mounted jib crane 3 years ago for one job. The crane did not cost much, we took the tractor on the plant trailer to a job 20 miles away and used it to drag large 90 straight felled conifers to the chipper.

I run the sawbench off the PTO, and use to run the splitter until I bought a new self powered one.

For another job we used the tractor with the front loader and also transport box on the back to shuttle timber from a wood to the customer's yard.

I have used it to help pull trees when straight felling.

I have also used a heavy duty flail mower on it for site clearance.

 

If I had a telehandler I could not do all of these jobs with it, and could not move it to the occasional job on a trailer behind Land Rover. 

 

I also used to have a well restored Fordson Power Major tractor with a bigger loader on it, but the Kubota is way more useful than this was, and is so manoeverable.

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7 minutes ago, maybelateron said:

I have Kubota STV40 compact tractor with front loader.

The bucket is great for moving logs, woodchip, and good sized bits of timber.

I bought a cheap 3 point mounted jib crane 3 years ago for one job. The crane did not cost much, we took the tractor on the plant trailer to a job 20 miles away and used it to drag large 90 straight felled conifers to the chipper.

I run the sawbench off the PTO, and use to run the splitter until I bought a new self powered one.

For another job we used the tractor with the front loader and also transport box on the back to shuttle timber from a wood to the customer's yard.

I have used it to help pull trees when straight felling.

I have also used a heavy duty flail mower on it for site clearance.

 

If I had a telehandler I could not do all of these jobs with it, and could not move it to the occasional job on a trailer behind Land Rover. 

 

I also used to have a well restored Fordson Power Major tractor with a bigger loader on it, but the Kubota is way more useful than this was, and is so manoeverable.

How did you find it with the flail mower? I've got a 35 hp compact and have been toying with the idea of getting a flail mower but not sure if I've got enough grunt to drive it in the rougher stuff.. its a branson 3510. So probably more comparable to a 30hp kubota in reality, them korean horses don't seem as strong! What width was your flail?

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