Jump to content

Arbtrader Classifieds

Featured Adverts


Categories

  1. Arborist Equipment

    climbing equipment, PPE etc

    6
    adverts
  2. ArbTrucks/Vehicles

    Chip trucks, pick up trucks etc

    15
    adverts
  3. Arborist Machinery

    Woodchippers, Stump grinders, MEWP's etc

    5
    adverts
  4. Chainsaws

    Chainsaws and other hand held power tools

    8
    adverts
  5. Agricultural/Forestry Machinery

    Tractors, trailers, cranes etc

    1
    advert
  6. Firewood Machinery

    Firewood processors, wood splitters, saw benches etc

    4
    adverts
  7. Miscellaneous

    For everything else

    5
    adverts

What's New

  • Blogs

    1.  Leading British importer of multifunction loaders MultiOne UK, announces a new dealership in the Cambridgeshire Fens region. With immediate effect, HQ Forklifts Ltd will offer special sales, support and service for MultiOne users. Based in Doddington, Cambridgeshire, HQ Forklifts Ltd are well positioned and equipped to support the Cambridgeshire region.

       

       

      Designed and manufactured in Italy, the MultiOne mini loaders have been sold globally for 18 years by MultiOne SRL who have pioneered a complete range of multifunction loaders with advanced hydraulics, innovative design and Kubota & Yanmar engines.

       

      ABOUT HQ FORKLIFTS LTD

       

      HQ Forklifts Ltd is a family run materials handling business based in the heart of the Fens in East Anglia. The company prides itself on establishing and maintaining excellent customer relations, giving support 24 hours day, 365 days a year.

      With 5 mobile workshop vans, HQ Forklifts Ltd is able to service most types of material handling equipment including the MultiOne, and can already maintain machines within a 50-mile radius of the HQ Forklifts Ltd base.  As members of the CFTS (Consolidated Fork Truck Services), HQ are fully qualified to carry out thorough inspections (LOLER) on the full range of  MultiOne Mini Loaders, attachments and other material handling equipment.

      The HQ Forklifts Ltd sales team are geared to offer on-site non-obligation demonstrations of the MultiOne product and the numerous attachments MultiOne offer to all types of businesses including builders, farmers, nurseries, event companies, landscape gardeners and to any other business that needs to use a small pivot machine in confined spaces

      Farming_mini loader MultiOneHay Grab AttachmentRE Buildings Ltd - Sweeper AttachmentRE Buildings Ltd - Silage Fork
       
       
       

      Charlie Marks – MD HQ Forklifts Ltd

      “We’re extremely excited to be involved with MultiOne UK and are able to offer machine sales, spot hire and contract hire. We also offer bespoke finance and service packages, to make your life easier.” 

      Charlie added,

      “We’ve seen a huge increase of interest from the Equestrian sector following a MultiOne Showcase at Equifest 2017. We’ve recently employed a MultiOne product specialist Victoria Crosbie, who will be promoting the MultiOne to Equestrian Centres in the East Anglian Area.’

       
       

      This partnership strengthens the MultiOne representation which already includes East Midlands, Yorkshire & The Humber, North West England, South East and Northern Ireland.

       
       
       
      MultiOne mini loader 7 series with backhoeMultiOne 5 SeriesMultiOne 5 SeriesMultiOne Light Material BucketScreen-Shot-2017-08-14-at-11.03.44-495x4Screen-Shot-2017-09-04-at-09.53.27-495x4MultiOne Screening Bucket AttachmentMultiOne mini loader 2 series with bucket mud 2
       
       

      Steve Hadfield, MD of MultiOne UK, said:

      “The MultiOne brand continues to grow rapidly in the UK, and we are excited about this new partnership with HQ Forklifts Ltd and look forward to progressing MultiOne in that area.”

       

      The demand for MultiOne mini loaders has increased over the last 12 months mainly due to the MultiOne unique benefits such as the 170 attachments available, it’s impressive power, performance and the ability to manoeuvre in hard to get places.

       
       

      Over 170 Attachments Available

      The MultiOne range extends over 25 different models offering a wide range of working weights from the 12hp (tipping load of 250kg) of the MultiOne Baby 1 Series to the 78hp (with a max lifting capacity of 2700kg) of the Powerful MultiOne 10 Series.

      As with the competition in this sector, the MultiOne offers innovative solutions for those looking to maximize productivity in every industry from agriculture, construction, forestry, maintenance and greencare.

      With over 170 attachments available that can be changed within a matter of seconds, it ensures a solution is at hand for every task at a drop of a hat. Dig, Mow, Lift, Mix, Scrape, Carry, Trench, Plough, Grab, Sweep, Wash, Rake, Spray and much much more. Expensive labour costs are also reduced by mechanising a vast array of jobs. Hydraulic quick coupling systems are standard on all loaders providing effortless change over of attachments. This certainly provides One Total Solution.

       
       
      MultiOne was recently voted “Best in Class” by Farmers Guardian magazine
       
       
       
       
       
       
      To request a MultiOne demonstration from HQ Forklift Ltd, please contact them directly on 01354 740100, or visit their offices and showroom at Unit 6, Wheelhead Farm, Turf Fen Lane, Doddington. Cambridgeshire. PE15 0TB
       
    2. Man has always had a direct link to the landscape, though that link, whilst it is always there, may not be in the form that it once was. Keeping with the wood pasture theme, which I am really enjoying learning about through books and journal articles, I thought we’d look at how the manner in which we approach the ecosystem has changed over the centuries (quite briefly). Of course, what is written below doesn’t stop just at wood pasture – it has cross-over to other ecosystems, where the reasons for interaction with the landscape have altered through space and, more pertinently, time.

      Historically, wood pastures were managed for economic purposes. The grazing of animals on grasslands containing trees (and the feeding of the livestock with cuttings from pollarded trees, and a tree’s fruit crop), such as cattle and pigs, was for the direct benefit of communities, who relied upon the produce of the livestock (milk, meat, and so on) in order to make a living, and to generally therefore survive. Of course, the wood pastures needed to be conserved, so that they did not disappear, due to over-grazing. In this sense, they were actively conserved (by replanting dying and dead trees, and limiting grazing intensity), though largely because, without actively conserving them, the livelihood of many tens of thousands of people would be challenged. A by-product of this conservation of wood pastures, for the benefits created from grazing livestock, was that the sites were very rich in biodiversity – birds, fungi, insects, and plants, for example. The complex mosaic of niches within the wood pasture, ranging from open and disturbed soils through to the (perhaps sizeable) groves surrounded by the mantle and fringe vegetation, meant that a large number of organisms could viably frequent the site. However, for all of the biodiversity present as a result of the careful management and conservation of wood pastures throughout history, biodiversity was not the reason for management – until recently.

      The shift, in Europe, probably begun when wood pasture became disliked (for hope of a better word), during the 19th-20th century (varies depending upon the country). Foresters wanted to maximise output from the trees (coppice – sometimes with standards), and farmers wanted to maximise agricultural output. Therefore, the two practices, initially married, were divorced from one another (somtimes farmers were forced to stop grazing their livestock in wood pasture!). Wood pastures were thus either cleared of trees entirely, or alowed to regenerate into forest. With this came a decline in the richness of biodiversity and, eventually, this loss of biodiversity caused a rather evident of panic amongst conservationists. Ironically, therefore, the rationale behind creating and maintaining wood pasture became largely ecologically-driven, in place of economically-driven (though, particularly in Spain and Romania, wood pastures remain, are these are generally economically viable). Regardless of reason however, the status of wood pastures essentially went full-circle.

      wood-pasture-estonia.jpg?w=660&h=440

      A fantastic wood pasture in Estonia. Source: Ideas for Sustainability.

      Of course, this new found love for wood pastures does not necessarily mean that they can ever exist in the manner in which they did before. First and foremost, wood pastures are extensively grazed, and thus, for operations to be self-supporting financially, they must cover large expanses of land (unless the wood pasture is maintained for subsistence purposes, or grants are provided as a means of financial support). As farmers in Europe are generally in ‘the game’ for profit (they must make a living), managing livestock in wood pastures is probably not going to be all too popular, as it’d probably signal a marked drop in profits and / or a marked increase in labour input (at least, initially). Scope does exist to harvest edible mycorrhizal mushrooms from the wood pasture, such as truffles, though this is a specialised pursuit that is far from the current farming status quo of Europe.

      Furthermore, European culture has changed. Gone are the days of communities being self-sufficient, and instead many Europeans now work a job (that they may even hate) and buy their food from the supermarket (or even order it online). Therefore, is there even the desire to re-introduce wood pastures, for anything other than ecological reasons, or to supply the market with a niche animal product (such as Iberian ham from the black Iberian pig, in the holm oak dehesas of Spain). With this change in culture there has also been a change in learning priorities, and unfortunately many today seem to be fixated with knowing pointless facts about sports teams and celebrities. Functional and practical knowledge is largely gone. As a consequence, the management of wood pastures will be left to an expert few, where knowledge has either been gained academically, or via being passed-down through the generations (usually limited to rural areas where grazing still takes place). However, as more people now live in cities than in rural areas, and this trend will likely continue as rural areas are swallowed up by urban sprawl, or people move into cities for economic reasons, this tradition of passing practical knowledge on and keeping up the family tradition of extensive livestock grazing within wood pasture may very well become ever more the stuff of legend.

      black iberian pig dehesa

      The black Iberian pig grazing amongst a landscape of holm oak, in a Spanish dehesa. Source: Andrew Petcher.

      Society is simply in a different place than it once was. For this reason, the conservation of wood pasture is to be far from mainstream. People are certainly aware of nature (of which wood pastures feature), though more and more awareness comes from watching on the television and less from direct experience, and with this comes a discord. There is less emotional and cultural attachment to nature, and as a result, less of an impetus to associate with nature. Why help with the recreation of wood pasture when you can watch about its conservation on television, utter some lamentations, and then switch the channel and soon relegate it to a mere memory? That’s even assuming people watch such programs, in large numbers, in the first place.

      This probably turned out far more dystopian than I ever intended for it to come out as, though hopefully this illustrates how social changes have led to landscape management changes, with specific focus upon wood pastures in Europe. This is obviously applicable to other landscape types as well, of course. The principle generally carries across.

      Source (of inspiration): Hartel, T. & Plieninger, T. (2014) The social and ecological dimensions of wood-pastures. In Hartel, T. & Plieninger, T. (eds.) European wood-pastures in transition: A social-ecological approach. UK: Earthscan.

    3. We have been splitting logs lately, the timber has been lying in the yard for a couple of years and now we want to get it converted into logs to finish seasoning indoors so we have been busy with the firewood processor. Looking at the pile of logs and thinking about selling it all next winter has led me to consider the best way to market and sell our produce.  Since Trading Standards and the Weights and Measures Act 1985 have little to say regarding firewood we are a bit in the dark when it comes to quantities, packaging and pricing. With most goods the law is quite clear and very strict with serious penalties for suppliers who sell goods in quantities or measures outside those prescribed in the Act. Firewood however is a bit of a mystery, I suspect that it falls under the category of solid fuel, but its hard to confirm if thats the case. However it is viewed officially it would appear that the market is wholly unregulated.

       

      Logs are sold in a variety of ways, here are a few of the most common:

       

      By weight; usually by the “ton” however this is almost never confirmed by any kind of weigh bridge ticket something which  is likely to be illegal as far as the weights and measures act goes as one thing they are strict on is selling by weight. There is however a fundamental problem for the consumer with buying timber by the ton, this is simply that the wetter the wood the more it weighs. So there is an obvious incentive for the supplier to sell unseasoned wet wood as this will significantly ‘up’ his margin, if he bothers to weigh it at all that is!  Supermarkets have been dicing with the same issue for years when it comes to meat, hanging the meat performs the same function as seasoning logs, it dries out a little and whilst the flavour may improve, and possibly the price per kilo, the lost moisture is lost profit since they bought the meat by weight in the first place. They have got around this problem by injecting the meat with “stuff” to bulk up its weight, and apparently this is ok with trading standards! This has gone on for years of course, in times gone by bakers used to be infamous for adulterating their flour with fillers such as bone meal, chalk, sawdust and even gypsum! Thankfully at the end of the 19th century laws were brought in to standardise what could be called flour, maybe its time they took a look at bacon! (all that white stuff that comes out as it fries is the supermarkets added filler).

       

      So back to logs, selling by weight simply encourages the supplier to sell wet wood, and wet wood is not good for burning, not only does it produce little heat but because it burns at a lower temperature the combustion is incomplete, so gaseous tar and soot condense in your flue potentially leading to chimney fires. It would perhaps be ok to buy logs by weight at a known moisture content as happens in the wood chip for biomass industry, but that rarely happens.

       

      By far the best way to buy firewood is by volume, this way you get what you pay for, they may still be wet, but 100 logs are still 100 logs wet or dry, so now the incentive is with the supplier to sell a quality product, assuming he wants to keep your business that is. So the next problem to arise is quantifying that volume, a cubic meter is a relatively common unit and should be the ideal but thats not always the case, which leads us to what is perhaps the most common way of selling logs…..

       

      The load. So what is a load of logs? Well, anything you want it to be really, and this is where the industry really needs some guidance from the government. The load could be a bulk bag, but these vary in size from 2 cubic meters down to less than 0.5, or it could be a vehicle of some sort, trailer, pickup, 4×4 or even a car boot. From the consumers perspective how are they to compare one ‘load’ with another, does the back of one suppliers transit van compare favourably with another’s trailer? Who knows?  The upshot is the poor consumer is left in the dark. With weights and measures regulations so strict on other industries, including coal and smokeless fuel, why is it that logs are still in the dark ages when it comes to consumer protection?

       

      The answer may lie in the fact that during the industrial revolution we abandoned wood as a fuel, only to re-discover it in the last 10 years or so, and when the laws on weights and measures were made firewood just wasn’t on the radar. But these days it is most definitely back as a serious contender in the fuel market, sales of wood burning stoves have soared thanks to the carbon neutral credentials of  burning wood over fossil fuels. (don’t get me started on the carbon credentials of imported eastern european logs though!)

       

      Its time for HM Government to wake up to the burgeoning market in firewood and apply a little common sense to the way in which our logs are sold. We could do with a standardised moisture content for firewood, so that customers can expect to be able to get a certain calorific value from their wood, at least if its advertised as ‘ready to burn’ anyway. Then theres the weight / volume issue, logs really should be sold by volume, and all prices should be advertised by the cubic meter, irrespective of the size of vessel used to deliver them. This way the consumer can confidently compare prices from one supplier to the next. We have found that selling by the cubic meter we loose out to other suppliers selling by the bulk bag, our £60 per m3 has less appeal than a £50 bulk bag even though that bag may only contain 0.6 cube, making it considerably dearer, what do we do, sell unseasoned wood in order to cut our prices further, or try and skimp on the amount we sell?. Sadly the lack of regulation is currently driving quality down as firewood producers engage in a race to the bottom to stay in the game.

       

      So if you agree with the views expressed above please share this article on Facebook with your local trading standards office, yes they all appear to have FB accounts! You could also share it with your MP. You never know we may end up with a fairer firewood market in the not to distant future.

       

      For some further reading here’s a helpful PDF from the Forestry Commission.

      • 1
        entry
      • 4
        comments
      • 49
        views

      Recent Entries

      Simon Ash, UK Sales Manager at HAIX

       

      With the colder weather upon us, and heavy rainfall likely, your working conditions will become even more challenging. To cope with unpredictable climates, the protection your boots offer will become more important than ever.  However, your ‘waterproof’ boots might not actually be as waterproof as you think, with the current minimum standard still allowing some water penetration. Do you know   how harmful wet feet could be to your health?   

       

      A picture of health  

       

      If boots fail to provide the right level of waterproof protection and your feet become wet and cold, this could lead to serious health problems for the whole body. Wet feet are known to aggravate symptoms, weakening the immune system and reducing the blood flow to the nose and throat, allowing the body to be more susceptible to infections.

       

      Keeping your feet warm at 28-30 degrees and the body at a healthy temperature of 37-37.5 degrees is crucial in maintaining performance and wellbeing, also ensuring working time is not lost. 

       

      Waterproof 

       

      Learning the features that make a boot waterproof and understanding the consequences of not wearing the right protection could be the key to going home healthy and comfortable with dry feet. 

       

      The EN ISO standard: 20345/20347 is the minimum European standard manufacturers should achieve for boots to be labelled as waterproof. The standard stipulates up to 3cm2 of water can still enter the boot. Whilst you may think your boots are completely waterproof, this is the basic standard, and water can still get in. 

       

      A series of tests are conducted ensuring boots comply with the EN ISO standard. The first is a trough test where boots are subject to 1000 steps in a trough of water, for the equivalent of standing or walking in water for 10-15 minutes. The second test is the Dynamic Water Resistant Test involving a minimum of 4800 steps for the equivalent of walking or standing in water for 90-80 minutes. The trough test allows a maximum of 3cm2 water into the boot but the Dynamic test doesn’t allow any water ingress into the boot, anything above this limit, the boot fails to achieve the standard and is not considered waterproof.

       

      Preventing water penetration

       

      To combat water penetration, many of the boots designed by HAIX, also incorporate a GORE-TEX® Laminate that is durably waterproof, breathable and moderately insulated. The protection this offers is essential for providing the best protection for those working in unpredictable conditions. Each pore in the GORE-TEX® membrane is 20,000 times smaller than a droplet of water, ensuring the boot is completely and durably waterproof. 

       

       The GORE-TEX® Laminate combined with the outer materials and manufacturing techniques stipulated by Gore also ensures water does not become trapped between the upper and the membrane, something that could stop the boot from performing as it should.  Water intake not only causes wet fit but will also, reduce protection, and thermal efficiency within the boot. Internal components could rot, lessening material strength and encouraging bacterial growth as well as bad odours.

       

      Footwear incorporating the GORE-TEX® Laminate must undergo rigorous testing in a walking simulator ensuring absolutely no water penetration. The test involves 300,000 flexes for which is the equivalent of standing or walking for 80 hours in ankle high water, 300 times higher than the minimum EN ISO standard requirement. 

       

      Check your features

       

      When working in the forest, you should ensure boots labelled as waterproof perform as you need them to. The GORE-TEX® Laminate provides you with assurance that your boots are completely waterproof. This will enhance your working life and also possibly benefit you financially, as boots will not have to be regularly replaced.

       

      As the sky is set to get gloomier, ensure your boots are waterproof or pay the price physically and financially. 

       

      For more information visit, https://www.haix.co.uk/workwear/ or visit your local stockist, https://www.haix.co.uk/

       

      603019_propro_rgb_720x600.jpg.b41d44c494a563730b03ca65aeac1285.jpg

      • 0
        entries
      • 0
        comments
      • 235
        views

      No blog entries yet

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×