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David Humphries

Chalara fraxinea - Generic thread

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We have been doing lots of dead Ash removal for The Woodland Trust (East Sussex)mostly high risk/public access and roadside stuff.

The advice from the FC was if the tree is showing symptoms it is f***ed, get it down, resilience is virtually nil, if the tree shows no signs, leave it in the stand.

We took out 550+ in one stand in September last year, now that they are better spaced they are easier to inspect/monitor, there are some obvious spaces in the canopy where there are dead crowns, others are flushing beautifully.

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I am new here - came across this thread so decided to sign up.

I live in the middle of the Brechfa forest in West Wales.

We moved in 2.5 years ago. There were about 50 or 60 dead ash trees visible from my house. 

Last year I saw signs of recovery. This year they are doing very well. Loads of leaves! Only 1 still looks dead. Is this happening all over the UK or is it unique to our area? I think perhaps cutting down all these trees may have been rather hasty.

Hopefully these trees will pass on immunity to their offspring.

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Recovery from the symptoms of Chalara is being reported. However, it is not known why, or if, the recovery will last.

 

I doubt the trees are immune. They may have a greater or lesser degree of resistance. 

 

As the mortality rate is around 85% things aren't looking good. Also, ash is far more common than elm was, which survives, but mostly as regen. Therefore the loss of 85% of ash from our landscape will have a massive impact.

 

On an even gloomier note, Chalara does infect, and has been found on, other members of the Oleaceae family. On a more positive note, it doesn't appear to infect olives.

Edited by EdwardC

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3 hours ago, EdwardC said:

Recovery from the symptoms of Chalara is being reported. However, it is not known why, or if, the recovery will last.

 

I doubt the trees are immune. They may have a greater or lesser degree of resistance. 

 

As the mortality rate is around 85% things aren't looking good. Also, ash is far more common than elm was, which survives, but mostly as regen. Therefore the loss of 85% of ash from our landscape will have a massive impact.

 

On an even gloomier note, Chalara does infect, and has been found on, other members of the Oleaceae family. On a more positive note, it doesn't appear to infect olives.

On an even gloomier note, a death has occurred felling dead Ash in Petworth last week, don’t know much detail as yet but I assume there will be some update from Euroforest/FC/FISA  when they get their thumbs out of their arses, my thoughts are with the family.

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15 hours ago, The avantgardener said:

On an even gloomier note, a death has occurred felling dead Ash in Petworth last week, don’t know much detail as yet but I assume there will be some update from Euroforest/FC/FISA  when they get their thumbs out of their arses, my thoughts are with the family.

I heard upon the grapevine that it was oak, and crushed by the tree rather than hit by a falling limb. Thoughts with his family too.

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Not noticed any signs of recovery they look alot worse than last yr.

 


I reckon  atm

 

 

20% healthy no signs

60% minor signs of dieback @ tips of branches

15% half dead. (Whole crown effected, only a very few leaves left on many)

5%   dead.

 

 

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I hope this is my first survivor of Ash dieback, the leader shoot and the 2 side shoots died last year, and I thought it was a goner, it was certainly slow to come in the Spring/early Summer, but just today I observed that it appears to have bounced back, with several vigorous 4 foot long new seasons growth.

I say that simply because none of the other affected trees have shown any sign of recovery  like this one has.

 

DSC00315.JPG

Edited by difflock
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Wondered if someone with more experience than me can help. We look after a lake and the owner has told us his stand of Ash and Cherry has signs of Ash die back. After inspecting the trees,  the majority have no sign at all of any ailments. Among the 50 or so Ash trees, only one has any sign of anything like Chalara. 

We are in south Wiltshire which I think has little incidence of Chalara so far. 

The crowns are fine, looking healthy and totally normal.

The following photos show the crowns, the trunks typical of all the trees, then finally the one suspect tree. 

Is the last pic a clear sign of Chalara?

144F7022-BB05-4564-BD7A-48C9C19748AC.jpeg

D2BD3D83-BBD6-46B8-AA7C-4CF009C49B09.jpeg

37C5D61A-5545-4016-B61A-BA5F75FC704E.jpeg

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