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Gary Prentice

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About Gary Prentice

  • Rank
    Senior Member, Raffle Sponsor 2013, 2014, 2015
  • Birthday 28/01/1966

Personal Information

  • Occupation
    Arboriculturist
  • City
    Manchester

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  1. I learnt long ago to just be pragmatic about all this. In all of the planning process the Arb Method Statement is provided (objectively) to demonstrate that the build can be completed without detriment to retained trees. If it can, the box is ticked and the process moves on. I generally outline the build stages and propose a signing off of each stage, in that the MS has been adhered to. Planning includes a condition that the MS is followed, so technically if it isn't there's a contravention of conditions, exactly the same as changing the brick colour or whatever. I've never had a client object to getting the building stages signed off, but then again I've never been asked to sign off either, so the fault has surely got to lie with planning itself. Maybe it's just that the system has become a box ticking exercise and as long as new housing quotas are being filled that has become the main target. It's frustrating to see AMS's trashed but you just have to get over it, - or start stacking shelves in Tescos, while hoping that somewhere there's a proactive TO, planner and Legal department that'll do their jobs as legislation permits.
  2. Might be worth checking every connection/ground that you can find. Worked on a few different machines in the past, with intermittent faults, that have 'come right' before replacing expensive electronics. Can't remember what it was on now but one issue looked to be a voltage drop caused by a corroded lead on the alternator. Fully charged machine worked as it should, but then acted up as the battery voltage dropped during the day.
  3. Now that's a brew I'd forgotten about
  4. I can appreciate how frustrating this must be, having been involved in similar situations myself - pricing semi-mature replacements after the fact. With the absence of 'evidence' as to the perpetrator there's probably little that you can do, apart from make it plain that you're taking it seriously. It would probably be an uphill battle but have you contacted the police? First job is to get them to take it seriously, but considering the cost of felling, grinding and purchasing and establishing another similar sized tree would be approaching £5K (at a guess) there's enough of a loss to push for some intervention. At best you might just a community officer to ask the neighbours if they saw anything. That way you are least giving notice that you'll pursue (as far as you can) things and not just be a doormat to be walked over.
  5. you do realise Spud that the generation this guy appeals to probably doesn't even recognise anyone you're mentioned. at best they'll recognize Hendrix from the front of a T-shirt.
  6. I might be wrong but I thought Massaria colonised the tension wood to the top of limbs- causing failure of quite big limbs. Some of the dead limbs in the photos I'd just attribute to less competitive branches being over-shaded. (I can't actually see any stabilising. I think that @DavidHumphries has some hands on experience with this.
  7. Hindsight says that there is no difference in any of them. Who could image that when Churchill was talking about fighting on the beaches.....
  8. You could always ask her to move in
  9. Not a good time to be single then!
  10. You could always start a march of 1.
  11. It would be interesting to see more detailed figures. Locally it's been noticeable who does and doesn't (has or hasn't been practicing) practice the distancing and protection regs. We've, wife and I, concluded that because of multiple generational family homes the Asian families almost all were masked outside. (except for an element of younger men) Another consideration is also what jobs people do, lots in nursing and care home - in relation to the overall staffing levels.
  12. Any idea what the cause of decay is? Once you know what fungi it is you can start to hazard a guess at the trees potential longevity. 4m isn't particularly high if the stem is plumb - not much leverage on a good diameter stem. No good carving though if the fungus is decaying the heartwood though, in time the carving will start to deteriorate from the ground up. You've loads of things to consider so I'd be involving the carver and the client as early as possible. You never know, the client may spend the money for a carving with a less than usual life expectancy.
  13. Higher scrap value?
  14. Don't tell anyone, but I'm conducting a social experiment to see how far I can bait misters eggs and Johnson before someone gets offended on their behalves. I have a hypothesis that I'll offend others before I offend them

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