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David Humphries

Chalara fraxinea - Generic thread

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Just now, Paul Cleaver said:

We could do with members posting their pictures of  larger ADB felled trees as Jonny has done, and see if they are similar characteristics.

Seems like there are a lot of unknowns with this disease, so every ones experiences and observations are useful and would go towards a better understanding. Good idea Paul 

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I have spent a couple of days this week felling oversize diseased trees. Tbh any decay at the butt end could have been expected of trees of that size on that particular type of ground. 

I have felled a few parcels now , and certainly from a felling point have seen little difference in how the trees respond to non diseased trees.

I did take photos ,but sadly they are of poor quality and would be of little value to the discussion.

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I have mentioned a few posts back the observations we found when recently felling 550+ Ash with ADB, some with poor crowns, some completely gone.

I would estimate that 50 percent had some basal decay but no external sign/fungus present on the butt, these are plantation trees, not coppice stools and drawn up well in a mixed Beech compartment, no drought issues have been noted in any other tree species in this compartment, so why would drought only effect the Ash?

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I manage and work in a woodland in North Devon. We have quite a few ash in certain parts of the site. During the summer I had noticed a few showing signs of dieback, but have now noticed quite a few completely leafless crowns. Would you assume that they are dieback and remove if in a high traffic area and if safe to do so or would you expect some ash to have completely lost their leaves at this time of year?

Thanks for any thoughts

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The only ash I have (South Wales) with no (or very few) leaves at the moment have dieback. Your ash may be different, get someone who knows to check, but I'd fear the worst...

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IMG_4539.thumb.jpg.bc047b8ea63cae8408f7da683419fc3b.jpgIMG_4540.thumb.jpg.3de84cba8628df30e85f11d56eab0b54.jpg

Yesterday I had to fell a reasonable sized Ash tree that was showing advanced signs of ADB. I had heard that the disease shortens the wood fibres and makes them weaker. When I looked at the hinge I would normally expect on a healthy Ash to see menacing looking pointy needles of fibre sticking up but on this one the fibres were indeed shorter and blunter. I certainly wouldn’t want to fell one with a significant lean in the wrong direction.

We have noticed the grain is not as fibrous as it was when felling and they break away from the stump sooner, also spoke to a friend who does a lot of roadside work for County Highways and he said the same thing
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Just to add a completely new dimension into the mix, I came across this for the first time today.

The background story is. 

I was asked to plant several types of Ash from various parts of the world as a controlled experiment to monitor species resilience to ADB on an FC site known to have ADB present.

I have been monitoring them for the last 5 years, until now, all good.

Today I inspected some of the Syrian Ash, as I approached I noticed the dreaded tell tale sign, die back of the crowns resembling hedgerow trees.

What I found surprised me and I have never seen it in 26 years of Forestry. These are native Hornets completely ring barking  and stripping bark causing the tips to die back, anyone seen this habit before, and why only the Ash?

0B2B7FD7-A9E5-4339-AF6F-096269D5B5CB.jpeg

Edited by The avantgardener
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I've not seen hornets stripping bark, and we get quite a few hornets around here.

 

A quick google suggests it's common, I'll have to keep an eye out for the damage as I did notice hornets taking an interest in a particular ash tree.

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