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David Humphries

Chalara fraxinea - Generic thread

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2 hours ago, devon TWiG said:

I looked up about ADB in Europe to see if there has been any success in growing seedlings from the "resistant " trees and it seems success is very limited ...

 

I planted lots of different Ash from all over the world as an experiment at Bedgebury Pinetum 5 years ago, all look great so far but not holding my breath, it has already been confirmed in other host species of the Oleaceae family.

Edited by The avantgardener

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8 hours ago, The avantgardener said:

Last year we had a long hot summer in the South East, It was the first hot summer that lasted any length of time in years, 2018 had hot spells here but it is normal in Summer, before that 76,  as there been extensive annual droughts in other parts of the country that I am unaware of recently?

The Ash I took down recently was mixed with a Beech crop, Beech tends to suffer more from drought conditions than Ash, the Beech is fine , the Ash is f**ked, it’s been declining on this site for years and certainly isn’t coming back.

Sorry, but I don’t get your answer to my post - a lot of ash trees are knackered here too - some from the drought last year - others from charalia - people were saying that some trees were “recovering” and I queried what from.

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10 hours ago, The avantgardener said:

as there been extensive annual droughts in other parts of the country that I am unaware of recently?

In my part of Cheshire there certainly has and extends down through Shropshire as far as South Wales some years. 

Last year was extreme. I had an acre of well established apple trees that were wilted most of the year, I’ve never seen apples actually wilt before.

 

The EA publish records from throughout the country of ground water levels on an annual basis, they confirm the above. 

No drought here this year!

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1 hour ago, Pete Mctree said:

people were saying that some trees were “recovering” and I queried what from.

Not quite what I said. Which was; it has been reported that some trees are recovering from Chalara.

 

The jury's out on whether they are actually recovering from Chalara or it's just wishful thinking.

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On 22/06/2019 at 13:47, EdwardC said:

On a more positive note, it doesn't appear to infect olives.

That's not a positive note. Olives are akin to engorged ticks and should be incinerated for biosecurity reasons. I have no doubt that Xylella fastidosa was knocked up by someone who knew what they were doing, for the greater public benefit 🤮 

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16 hours ago, Adam M said:

That's not a positive note. Olives are akin to engorged ticks and should be incinerated for biosecurity reasons. I have no doubt that Xylella fastidosa was knocked up by someone who knew what they were doing, for the greater public benefit 🤮 

Heathen ! 🙂

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This may not be the precise best place to post this. However I've spotted an Ash nearby to my home that is exhibiting some significant foliage stress. I've taken a sample and it does not seem to be emenating from the leaf veins as per ADB rather from the leaf margin. 

I'm interested in what this could be for obvious reasons. The tree stands imediatley next to another which is not showing these signs of foliage stress. 

My next thought was verticillium wilt but it doesnt appear to match images I can see from a quick Google. 

All thoughts and theories welcomed. 

O

IMG_20190816_202534.jpegIMG_20190816_202544.jpeg1566145649959.jpeg

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IMG_4539.jpgIMG_4540.jpg

Yesterday I had to fell a reasonable sized Ash tree that was showing advanced signs of ADB. I had heard that the disease shortens the wood fibres and makes them weaker. When I looked at the hinge I would normally expect on a healthy Ash to see menacing looking pointy needles of fibre sticking up but on this one the fibres were indeed shorter and blunter. I certainly wouldn’t want to fell one with a significant lean in the wrong direction.

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3 hours ago, jonnygurkha said:

IMG_4539.jpgIMG_4540.jpg

Yesterday I had to fell a reasonable sized Ash tree that was showing advanced signs of ADB. I had heard that the disease shortens the wood fibres and makes them weaker. When I looked at the hinge I would normally expect on a healthy Ash to see menacing looking pointy needles of fibre sticking up but on this one the fibres were indeed shorter and blunter. I certainly wouldn’t want to fell one with a significant lean in the wrong direction.

I don't get this!

I could kind of accept that local to the point of infection there may be some changes in wood characteristics but even with advanced dieback within the crown I can't imagine it would alter the base of the stem.

 

My thoughts are based on how trees react to the DED fungus, compartmentalising infected twigs, tertiary and secondary branches - a progressive compartmentalisation process. I imagine that ash reacts in a similar way.

 

Could it be that as the vascular function diminishes with the loss of foliage/water uptake the lower moisture levels reduce the strength of the wood fibres in tension? I dunno :confused1:

 

The FISA guidance I read this week (IIRC) focused more on not using wedges for felling due to the vibrations causing dead limbs to fracture. Can't remember much about short grain when felling.

 

EDIT. Would/could drought conditions alter 'fibre strength'? Could there be a relationship there? 

Edited by Gary Prentice

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1 hour ago, Gary Prentice said:

I don't get this!

I could kind of accept that local to the point of infection there may be some changes in wood characteristics but even with advanced dieback within the crown I can't imagine it would alter the base of the stem.

 

My thoughts are based on how trees react to the DED fungus, compartmentalising infected twigs, tertiary and secondary branches - a progressive compartmentalisation process. I imagine that ash reacts in a similar way.

 

Could it be that as the vascular function diminishes with the loss of foliage/water uptake the lower moisture levels reduce the strength of the wood fibres in tension? I dunno :confused1:

 

The FISA guidance I read this week (IIRC) focused more on not using wedges for felling due to the vibrations causing dead limbs to fracture. Can't remember much about short grain when felling.

 

EDIT. Would/could drought conditions alter 'fibre strength'? Could there be a relationship there? 

We could do with members posting their pictures of  larger ADB felled trees as Jonny has done, and see if they are similar characteristics.

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