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David Humphries

Chalara fraxinea - Generic thread

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On 08/05/2020 at 08:08, Woodworks said:

What do the experts on here make of this slightly encouraging story?

 

WWW.BBC.CO.UK

Some habitats can help dampen the spread of ash dieback, which threatens ash trees.

 

"In particular, we identify that under a certain ash density, the disease will remain mild."

 

This fits in with my observations, the ash woodland I did some volunteering in has been devastated as have the self seeded ash in my mate's paddock as it re wilds, yet I have an ash in the garden, presumably brought in as seed with logs, which is 3 seasons old now and showing no signs. This village is on a light sandy soil and very few ash locally.

 

It would seem that individual trees may stave off (and compartmentalise?) a single spore entry through a leaf but become overwhelmed with multiple infections, much like the current viral load concerns.

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I drove from top of Leicestershire down to Cardiff via the Ross spur and back home via the GreenMech factory. ADB seems to be affecting vast amount of stock! Loads of DED spotted and a large number of distressed, leafless Silver Birch too. Have they got an issue too?

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We have a number of trees in various states of decline around home, many close together and of a similar size but at different stages of being buggered. Most are of little danger being in fields away from the public, but will start to damage other healthy trees of different species around them and put livestock at risk if they fail in an uncontrolled manner so I'm thinking it is going to be worth felling them at the point they are beyond hope but before they become too dangerous and unpredictable, but at what point is this? Is there a percentage of crown loss that is generally regarded as being a sign that it is irrecoverable?

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Interested in this thread as a new owner of a small woodland with a number of ash that look ok to my untrained eye. Plus one large ash in our back garden that only this year is looking distinctly leaf-deprived on one side compared to previous years. 

Pic of it in 2020, and another taken this year. 

I can see no lesions, no leaf die back or discolouration, and the inside of any small dead branches that fall are a clean, balsa-like colour with no blackening. 

 

Ash tree 2020.jpg

Ash tree 2021.jpg

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On 14/07/2021 at 11:55, Stev0 said:

Interested in this thread as a new owner of a small woodland with a number of ash that look ok to my untrained eye. Plus one large ash in our back garden that only this year is looking distinctly leaf-deprived on one side compared to previous years. 

Pic of it in 2020, and another taken this year. 

I can see no lesions, no leaf die back or discolouration, and the inside of any small dead branches that fall are a clean, balsa-like colour with no blackening. 

 

Ash tree 2020.jpg

Ash tree 2021.jpg

That is how they go .

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On 26/08/2020 at 21:02, Toad said:

We have a number of trees in various states of decline around home, many close together and of a similar size but at different stages of being buggered. Most are of little danger being in fields away from the public, but will start to damage other healthy trees of different species around them and put livestock at risk if they fail in an uncontrolled manner so I'm thinking it is going to be worth felling them at the point they are beyond hope but before they become too dangerous and unpredictable, but at what point is this? Is there a percentage of crown loss that is generally regarded as being a sign that it is irrecoverable?

If you are going to fell them do it before they become too brittle . Try and avoid having to bang wedges in as this can cause dead limbs to fall , on you .

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