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Witterings

How Often Do You Clean Your Glass / What With??

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As per title really ... I'm a stove newbie since October so am still in the honeymoon period and clean the glass every time in between fires with just kitchen towel and water and the majority of the time any residue comes off pretty easily although there have been a few logs that have made quite a mess and left somethig really hard to remove ... almost like they've some chemical in them that stains the glass.

 

I can see the novelty value will wear off at some stage (unless I can convince the Mrs it's a pink job 😄 ) and won't want to do it every time but for the same token don't want to trash it by not doing it often enough so it becomes really hard to clean and you can't get it all off. 

 

Interested to know what others do ... google searching suggests dipping a wet kitchen towel in the ash gets rid of most stuborn stuff ... surprised that doesn't scratch the glass which means the next time residue will get in the scratches making it even harder to get out?? 

Edited by Witterings

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55 minutes ago, Witterings said:

As per title really ... I'm a stove newbie since October so am still in the honeymoon period and clean the glass every time in between fires with just kitchen towel and water and the majority of the time any residue comes off pretty easily although there have been a few logs that have made quite a mess and left somethig really hard to remove ... almost like they've some chemical in them that stains the glass.

 

I can see the novelty value will wear off at some stage (unless I can convince the Mrs it's a pink job 😄 ) and won't want to do it every time but for the same token don't want to trash it by not doing it often enough so it becomes really hard to clean and you can't get it all off. 

 

Interested to know what others do ... google searching suggests dipping a wet kitchen towel in the ash gets rid of most stuborn stuff ... surprised that doesn't scratch the glass which means the next time residue will get in the scratches making it even harder to get out?? 

Ash and a kitchen wipe keeps ours clean. The odd log you say is causing more staining ?? That could be the settings you have the stove at or the moisture content also don’t let it get too far down before adding more logs, in all honestly there are a few variables but it’s a fire at the end of the day so I’m sure things will become more familiar. Cleaning the glass is a pink job, cutting logs etc and making sure fire is right is defo a blue job. 

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kitchen towel and a squirt of Cillitbang .  The brown gum stains from a log with too much wet in it usually burns off with the next fire anyway .

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Ash and baby wipe then polish the glass with newspaper, done for 12yrs and the glass is un scratched. I clean the glass every few days, I run it with vents open which means little build up on the glass. J.

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Newspaper,bit of water and ash.
If you get a really thick build up, just crank the fire right up, blast it until the crap burns off.
Next day newspaper scrub.

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I don't ever clean it. To an extent, the stove you have will determine how clear it stays (our old Jotul style stove requires cleaning every few weeks, our current Woodwarm doesn't) but mainly how you operate the stove influences it. Shutting down a fire to the point where it's smoldering will cause a soot/ash buildup on the glass. Having a stove thermometer on the flue makes a huge difference, and I'd recommend it for anyone.

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I rarely clean the glass.  Live in this place nearly 2 years and think we have cleaned the stove glass 4 or 5 times.

 

Just get a nice hot bed of embers going and any residue  burns off.  That is a bit of dead oak I had dismantled that day on a bed embers from spruce and pine.

 

 

D89E44F8-87AF-441F-9ED6-D49852E50D34.jpeg

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9 hours ago, Witterings said:

As per title really ... I'm a stove newbie since October so am still in the honeymoon period and clean the glass every time in between fires with just kitchen towel and water and the majority of the time any residue comes off pretty easily although there have been a few logs that have made quite a mess and left somethig really hard to remove ... almost like they've some chemical in them that stains the glass.

 

I can see the novelty value will wear off at some stage (unless I can convince the Mrs it's a pink job 😄 ) and won't want to do it every time but for the same token don't want to trash it by not doing it often enough so it becomes really hard to clean and you can't get it all off. 

 

Interested to know what others do ... google searching suggests dipping a wet kitchen towel in the ash gets rid of most stuborn stuff ... surprised that doesn't scratch the glass which means the next time residue will get in the scratches making it even harder to get out?? 

About once a year if it needs it.  And if there is any soot a scourer and cream cleaner works for my Morso.

 

But I burn really dry wood and generally it keeps itself clean.

59ED8B52-CA74-409F-86A2-E80473F6AA74.jpeg

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I've definitely noticed it builds up if I turn it down / close the vents more ... maybe I'm just doing it too much especially with nights like last night where it's not that cold and you need a bit of heat but cranking it up would be too hot coupled with it uses less wood.

 

I probably turn it down more as teh evening goes on as well, the rooms warmer and I guess the surrounding brickwork is also gvong off heat at that stage.

 

Where do most people set their vents to when it's up and running and not too cold .... about 1/2 way????

Edited by Witterings

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