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openspaceman

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About openspaceman

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    Senior Member, User formerly known as catweazel

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  • Location:
    Surrey
  • Interests
    openspaces
  • Occupation
    admin

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  1. 2017 roundup: Productivity vs Injury Rates

    Thanks understood now
  2. 2017 roundup: Productivity vs Injury Rates

    In the position he is it's not a big problem because if he were unable to control the kickback his hand would be struck by the front guard and trigger the brake. The problem is more pronounced when felling when the hand is on the side of the front handle, if the saw kicks back th e hand falls toward the bar. At least he is wearing gloves. Many of us do it with no consequences but it remains a practice that will cause a candidate to fail an assessment. A bit like YO YO starting.
  3. Electric Cars

    Not quite but I just handed on a honda civic hybrid with 100k miles. Perfect in every respect but the IMA battery is just about playing up, £2000 to replace. If it gets through MOT without warning lights showing my mate will just potter around in it without the electric motor assist. Interestingly the previous lady owner only managed 39mpg yet in the short time he's had it he's getting 50mpg.
  4. Best ways to separate diesel from water?

    Mine's out on loan at the moment but the MR Funnel has a sump at the bottom for the water to collect in, this means that if you pour clean fuel in it there is always a residual amount of fuel in the bottom. It's great for filtering a small amount of contaminated drainings which you inevitably have AFTER you have taken the measures Bob and Treequip have advised, but it's slow. I'd use it to fill the machines with rather than try and sort an already contaminated tank, gravity will do the separation given time. With diesel the worry will be that bugs have been living in the water and living off the diesel so there may be a gel of them on the bottom of the tank which needs dealing with. Once sorted just make sure the fuel draw off point is a couple of inches above the drain tap.
  5. Which winch rope?

    The smaller wires won't survive abrasion from sliders well so I’d stick with 6x19, it's also easier to splice. I preferred hemp cored for the same reason and it's more flexible. Most of mine were also galvanised so resisted rusting quite well but I did occasionally oil them.
  6. memorial carving for a friend

    Agreed, it's a good memorial well executed I have neither the skill nor the artistry
  7. Rootball processing

    If you dig them you get the whole root and any big laterals out, then a mulcher over a windrow of them deals with them in quick order. Many times I've see roots ground out that then subsequently cause problems as they were not deep enough. Grinders are great for back gardens but 360 and mulcher works well for development sites where the topsoil and mulch can be bunded and then used later in the soft landscape works.
  8. unclaimed tree

    "appear" being the operative word If it's council land it's publicly owned but that says nothing about what rights the public may have over it. If it's common then the owner will be whoever succeeded to the title of the manor, that would mean those rights shared in common with the landowner by individual households will now be covered by various acts of parliament from the 1906 openspaces act, the 1925 law of property act and the various commons acts from 1899 through to 2006. Some private commons possibly still exist with no pubic rights over them, The fact is land is always owned by some entity and if it can pass to no one on death then it reverts to the crown. I suspect anyone suing for criminal damage would pursue the person most likely to have assets. Having said that I know of a case where about 10 mature pines were felled by a neighbour, for the view. The FC would not pursue the felling licence angle and the costs of action exceeded the value of the trees so the owner could do nothing.
  9. I think having the top covered is the nub. I have shown it's fairly easy to get a 2kg green log down to below 20% in free air as an indivudual but it's something else to do the same in a stack as airflow becomes the limiting factor.
  10. This is my experience too. I have just this week cut into a stack of sycamore that appeared to have dried out in the round, bark had fallen off and the incipient rot is plain to see, it has lost nearly 4% of it's weight in 4 days in my unheated outhouse. From which I conclude it has regained moisture from it's more open texture. It also burns poorly with little flame which also suggests it's the more volatile bits of the dry matter that have been lost to rot. So yes, cut and prepare it from green, maintain good airflow and prevent it rewetting so as to get it below the moisture content where rotting microbes can respire dry matter as soon as possible.
  11. Chimney fire causes?

    Big J What is the current temperature and relative humidity where you are? It's joiners and craftsmen that are most interested in equilibrium moisture content as they can then make a judgement about how the finished article will "move" as the seasons change with central heating being also a factor. As such the moisture content is often quoted as a % of the oven dry weight, rather than the % of the wet weight we tend to use. So whilst the wet weight basis and dry weight basis converge at 0% a moisture content of a bit less than 17% wwb is equal to a moisture content of 20% dwb. The equilibrium moisture content hardly changes with normal ambient temperature in UK, about 2% dwb between 0C and 30C so the main variable is relative humidity. Here is Surrey it is 6C and RH is about 90%, because it is raining, so the equilibrium moisture content of wood should be about 22% dwb 18% wwb but as it takes time for the log to gain moisture on average in the winter it will be a bit lower, as long as it cannot be re wetted. In high summer with a temperature around 20C and RH 40% it will drop to 8% dwb 7.4%wwb. In winter when we need to burn logs I would expect it to hover just below 18% mc wwb. In practise I have done rather badly with drying this year's logs, I'm not sure why but possibly too much oak which did not dry well
  12. Making the news today....

    Enough wealth to afford education for women to be able to take control of family size seems to be the key. Look at Hans Roslin's TED talks where he graphically illustrates how family size changes in response to wealth, no matter what religion may be involved. It's also time to realise that one's issue don't owe the you anything and the parent owes the children all they need, rather than be considered a hedge fund for old age. What on earth made me delve into this thread?
  13. Tree Of Life. BBC1. 11/02/18. 5:00pm

    I just caught up with it on Iplayer, good show Timon
  14. Liverpool City Council propose charging for Park use

    Why call me naive when I posed a question? I have no knowledge of the costs involved in managing a beach. The principal remains the same, if a commercial undertaking makes used of a facitlity maintained by public funds for public use then they should pay that portion of the costs attributed to their activity. Asking them to pay more is a tax on the commercial activity. How it can be done equitably and without incurring unnecessary addition costs or bureaucracy is the problem. WRT professional dog walking I suspect much of this is cash in hand and outwith the economy or control
  15. Chimney fire causes?

    I think so; the reason being that to burn wood cleanly you need a flame. That flame needs time to completely burn the gases given off by the heat. The oxygen from the air has to diffuse into these gases and it burns the lighter hydrogen fractions off first. The yellow you see in the flame is the remaining heavier carbon compounds glowing in the flame. As long as they have enough dwell time in the flame they too burn out but if they touch a cold surface first they don't and remain as sooty particles which then combine with any tarry vapours and congeal onto the flue further up. Once this layer gets thick enough and the fire is roaring it burns in the excess air, often with a blue flame in the chimney top as carbon monoxide is generated and catches when it reaches fresh air. Main way of preventing this is to burn hot and fast and not overload the fire. Never shut it down to smoulder but only when only a char bed remains

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