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Rob_the_Sparky

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  1. I'm not that far North of Surrey so there is hope if you are happy with arisings...
  2. A bottle of wine for a small delivery, 2 for a larger delivery - that is for arisings so any wood that he has left from a job that he does not want for himself (and assuming he is passing my place anyway).
  3. Yeah, I like cherry but then I am comparing it to mostly softwoods. Oak and beech are also meant to be very good but I don;t get enough of either to judge so maybe you are just comparing good with very good?
  4. Very very strict, how many images of logs against house walls are there in the Norwegian firewood book?
  5. put in a naked flame (e.g. a some waste paper + match) and the gas will burn as produced. More heat and no boom.
  6. It need not be a veranda but if you have a blank wall you can build a vented wood structure against it large enough to store your logs (or even put the IBC straight in??). If you have a door in this wall then instant access to logs from inside and out. Most of us mere mortals put up with logs racks and/or garage (I store dried logs in there) close to the back door though Don;t get very wet fetching logs into the house as it isn't very far and paths ensure no mud.
  7. Don't understand. Any carbon that can be locked up is less in the atmosphere to worry about. Got nothing to do with kids, it would be in the atmosphere quicker if chipped or burnt having a worse impact on the atmosphere. Got any better suggestions to add to the discussion?
  8. How can you smell the laurel when it is on the burner? TBH I'm much with the earlier statement, if it is seasoned it is good. Maybe because I'm burning arisings so I burn what I get. Some woods are better for slow burn, some for getting quick heat. I have also learned (only been doing it a few years) that it is better to split some woods into larger chunks and some into smaller bits. I.e. the lighter softwoods just don;t last long enough in small chunks and also can burn very hot if you put several on at once, solution is to leave it in big chunks. These last longer and don't burn so hot. Do the same with a dense wood though and it could the fire too much, with these it is better to put on two smaller chunks than one big one. Sorry for not doing it by species, I generally don;t know so judge it by density generally. The load of Cherry I got last year was nice and Laurel is good but I rarely get decent diameter wood.
  9. I've got a magnetic thermometer as above but this was my first log burner and it certainly has helped to learn to drive it. I still find it useful occasionally but don't sit there monitoring it. It was so cheap so I'm not sure why I wouldn't have it...
  10. As above total price, if it is something that is branded so you know you are getting the same thing regardless of where you buy it. If it is offered locally then I'm happy to pay a bit more to support a walk in store but depends on how much more.
  11. The slab "pallets/boxes" I use on their sides are not as big a standard pallet and made from hardwood, very similar to these.
  12. Ask your solicitor. There have been similar agreements on both our previous properties (in our case for buried high voltage cable) and it took a while for them to surface. Including one that gave the electricity board the right to knock down an extension on one house as they had built it in an area that was affected by an exclusion zone around a buried cable. Worth checking these things...
  13. I (a DIY type) do something similar. Around this time of year I will empty the logs from my outside racks where they have been drying for a few months and transfer them to the garage. It is not heated but is pretty well sealed plus I keep a de-humidifier running in there to keep the cars dry (fun car in storage over winter). Single stack them against the walls with brick returns keeping the stacks in place, nothing clever needed as these are already dry (unless I have messed up!). Approx 0.7m^3 per stack and I get about 5 stacks in there, plus the outside racks will get re-filled. Garage smells lovely and dehumidifier is certainly not having any issues keeping the place dry enough to prevent condensation, which is my aim. Outside I have made log racks from various things. Simplest are "box" like pallets used for paving slabs turned on their side, stacked and some planks thrown on the top for a roof. Also made one from 3 pallets, 2 planks and 4 nails + a roof from some old material. N.B. all planks are from broken up pallets. Then also have a posher rack made from old fence posts with rotten end cut off for main structure plus load of planks from broken up pallets for sides, back and roof (+ wood treatment to stop it rotting). Nothing complex but the wife prefers the "posh" option! Looks nicer than old pallets but doesn't dry logs any better.
  14. Mine was install of hearth, surround and burner in a new build fireplace. I had no major issues but the connection from the burner flue to the chimney isn't great. The average person might quite happily accept it as it is functional but I'm picky and it bugs me. However, as I have a lot of jobs to do and it functions, flue gases get drawn up the chimney, (albeit with some air from the room as well) it won't get changed for a while...

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