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Sycamore tree overgrown?


jazzman
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I have a "monster" tree in my front garden which I believe is a Sycamore/Acer type tree?  The mess this tree is making is incredible and some of my neighbours are complaining about the mess the tree is making on the street.

 

The problem is the property is owned by a  local housing association. I have tried several times to see if the tree can be removed or even cut back, unfortunately the housing association is refusing to do either, probably due to the cost of subcontracting the work out.

 

My question is it reasonable to request for this tree to be cut back? and if so does this type of work have to be carried out on a regular basis i.e. how many years?

 

Thanks

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It sounds a pretty dangerous situation. I suppose the only thing to do to keep the public safe and prevent litigation is cordon off the area to your front door with heras fencing and warning signs until such a time as a full and through raking can be carried out. Once complete, the works will have to be signed off by an authorised competent person. They might see it fit to arrange for a skid test to be carried out on the surface.

 

If/when the path meets the required standards, the inspector will issue you with a "Pafftag", which you can hang on your handrail, the next inspection is due 7 days later;

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Recently I heard about a lad with a big sycamore blocking a lovely view through a wee valley.

 

He waited until a stormy night, nipped out with the saw and bowled it over whole tree. It did a wee bit of damage to an old wall but he got away scot free! Might be worth a try.

 

If you used an electric saw and tidy it up quick I doubt anyone would even notice in the morning. 

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I guess when I posted last that the discount supermarkets local to you had sold out of cheap leaf blowers? You might be in luck that the Americans Black Friday is this week, might get a cheap one then? Reckon under £50.

 

You might comment that it is their tree and might have a point if the HA look after your garden and do the cleaning for you, but if you do the gardening and cleaning then I reckon cleaning up the leaves comes under your responsibility - same as my house, I make sure the access is maintained and kept clear for visitors safety (HA should be responsible for bricks and mortar, but the rest?)

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Reducing or indeed polarding that will be a train wreck imo. Norway maples really don’t tolerate reduction well in my experience, regardless how light you go. Pollarded it will look absolutely rotten. 

I'd heed the advice of many here and learn to live with leaves staining your path (??). It’s a bonny tree. Minimal intervention is probably best.  

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17 minutes ago, Mr. Squirrel said:

Reducing or indeed polarding that will be a train wreck imo. Norway maples really don’t tolerate reduction well in my experience, regardless how light you go. Pollarded it will look absolutely rotten. 

I'd heed the advice of many here and learn to live with leaves staining your path (??). It’s a bonny tree. Minimal intervention is probably best.  

Really? Not my experience at all.

They take a good hammering, weak attachment points on the regrowth, but redone every 5 years or so avoids any issues.

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1 hour ago, Mick Dempsey said:

Really? Not my experience at all.

They take a good hammering, weak attachment points on the regrowth, but redone every 5 years or so avoids any issues.


I generally see weak attachments from very poor wound occlusion. Unless it’s a necessary intervention due to a mechanical issue like a grotty union I just wouldn’t. 

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