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Sycamore tree overgrown?


jazzman
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I have a "monster" tree in my front garden which I believe is a Sycamore/Acer type tree?  The mess this tree is making is incredible and some of my neighbours are complaining about the mess the tree is making on the street.

 

The problem is the property is owned by a  local housing association. I have tried several times to see if the tree can be removed or even cut back, unfortunately the housing association is refusing to do either, probably due to the cost of subcontracting the work out.

 

My question is it reasonable to request for this tree to be cut back? and if so does this type of work have to be carried out on a regular basis i.e. how many years?

 

Thanks

tree.JPG

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That’s no monster it’s barely semi mature !… it’s requests like this that made my last day contracting for local housing associations a happy one. 
no pruning,  unless it’s raising the crown is going to benefit it , it will go absolutely crazy and be more of problem if you do so. 

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21 minutes ago, MattyF said:

That’s no monster it’s barely semi mature !… it’s requests like this that made my last day contracting for local housing associations a happy one. 
no pruning,  unless it’s raising the crown is going to benefit it , it will go absolutely crazy and be more of problem if you do so. 

How will it be more of a problem?

It will not go “absolutely crazy” it’ll regrow.

It is, as you say, not even fully grown, so left to its own devices it’ll be more troublesome.

Start a pollard cycle, the OP gets what he wants, neighbours are happy.

 

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4 minutes ago, Mick Dempsey said:

How will it be more of a problem?

It will not go “absolutely crazy” it’ll regrow.

It is, as you say, not even fully grown, so left to its own devices it’ll be more troublesome.

Start a pollard cycle, the OP gets what he wants, neighbours are happy.

 

Who’s going to pay for the future management, you know as well as I do if you reduce that tree it will put on the growth and more to compensate within a few years if it’s reduced to any level to keep the residents happy. 
Having also re pollarded trees and received massive abuse for it in housing associations property’s  you can be my guest… again they will have to fit the bill for continued management and listen to half the street complaining about butchering them whilst the rest complaining and petitioning to get them felled because they are scared of slipping on leaves … 

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1 hour ago, jazzman said:

I have a "monster" tree in my front garden which I believe is a Sycamore/Acer type tree?  The mess this tree is making is incredible and some of my neighbours are complaining about the mess the tree is making on the street.

 

The problem is the property is owned by a  local housing association. I have tried several times to see if the tree can be removed or even cut back, unfortunately the housing association is refusing to do either, probably due to the cost of subcontracting the work out.

 

My question is it reasonable to request for this tree to be cut back? and if so does this type of work have to be carried out on a regular basis i.e. how many years?

 

Thanks

tree.JPG

If that is a sycamore it should go, in my opinion.  Totally unsuitable location for a tree of that type.  If it is a field maple it might be OK, though if it were my property I would rather have something of a more appropriate size like rowan or laburnum.

 

If your neighbours are bothered about the tree they need to raise it with the housing association.  If enough people complain they may take action.  And if it is not protected by a preservation order then common sense suggests they would replace it with a tree that will not outgrow its position.  

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37 minutes ago, MattyF said:

Who’s going to pay for the future management, you know as well as I do if you reduce that tree it will put on the growth and more to compensate within a few years if it’s reduced to any level to keep the residents happy. 
Having also re pollarded trees and received massive abuse for it in housing associations property’s  you can be my guest… again they will have to fit the bill for continued management and listen to half the street complaining about butchering them whilst the rest complaining and petitioning to get them felled because they are scared of slipping on leaves … 

Fair points.

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For the 2 housing associations we work for, the tenants are responsible for the tree. The only time they will step in is if the tenant who must be means tested, cannot afford to remove a dangerous tree. 

 

You or whoever lives there needs to check the lease agreement 

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