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Rob D

New bar and old chains... they don't go together!

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Khriss, all the guys I know in forestry pretty mich chop their saws in after a year or two.  Depending on the model or saw.

 

Why bother doing repairs as it is imperative to keep cutting and avoid down time.  New saws are better than old.  The cost of the saw comes out of the customers pocket, not yours...  if you are doing it right that is.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Rich Rule said:

Thing is Steve, you get paid to fix them, users get paid to use them.  The more the user wrecks the saw the more work you have...

 

I am certainly not a Saint for keeping maintenance up to date.  I think I have cleaned the air filter in my 441 now about 5 or 6 times.  I got it at one of the Apf’s years ago...  probably 8 or 10 years ago.  It still works and screams when it is cutting.

 

Surely, it is a simple relationship which works well?

And that is the point, I fix them for a years use + and I don't want or need the extra work.

Imagine you spent a day doing a superb reduction and then a week later you saw a couple of ijuts cutting the tree down, apart from you being paid for your work, it would be pretty demoralising and that is how I feel sometimes when I get saws singing, nice and clean etc then a few weeks later...trashed.

Generally it isn't like that and is more people asking for their saws to be ported and then they add that the saw hasn't run since it was seized two years ago....REALLY! Sometimes it is like a black comedy with saws being more suited to a skip than a rebuild and port.

I guess I know the effects of a blocked air filter - not naming the guy in France that sent me a saw that wouldn't rev when hot that all I did was clean the air filter!

Not sure what is worse, not doing any maintenance or someone doing it and not knowing what they are doing...seen some horror stories in my time!

I recently started asking when the saw was last serviced....now that is relatively amusing!!

 

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On 15/05/2020 at 20:44, Khriss said:

All that cack on saw is from blunt teeth ( an the wear pattern) chainsaws are nearly self cleaning with sharp teeth = no dust just shavings. K

Usually get dust from the angled part of the gob cut.

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12 hours ago, Rich Rule said:

Khriss, all the guys I know in forestry pretty mich chop their saws in after a year or two.  Depending on the model or saw.

 

Why bother doing repairs as it is imperative to keep cutting and avoid down time.  New saws are better than old.  The cost of the saw comes out of the customers pocket, not yours...  if you are doing it right that is.

 

 

I know Rich 😆 i am just a bit precious with saws. FC would chop theirs in every year, but on their work, saw had paid for itself anyway. K

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I remember when I bought my first 346 ( non silver side non de comp smaller cc ), From DM chainsaws I asked Matt if he thought it would last a year . he said oh year , for sure as long as you look after it . Four years later , still going strong it was stolen out of the back of the chipper . I think it was 1999 ? Wonder if its still running ?

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Have to say, in the Oregon manual it says to soak a chain in oil overnight before using it.

Never done that, usually just give it a minute low revs until the oil is flinging and then check tension.

Anyone here a chain soaker?

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53 minutes ago, Dan Maynard said:



Anyone here a chain soaker?

Don't smoke at all . 😊

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On 16/05/2020 at 19:18, Rich Rule said:

I get your point in a way Rob.  I wouldn’t describe it as wrecking your kit though.  
 

A saw is there to be used and I use them.  When something wears out I either fix it, get it fixed, do without or buy another.  
 


 

 

Yep and I think that's fair enough - you pays your money takes your chances. It's up to folks how they do things... it's the painful few who feel that if something breaks it is never them and they don't want to pay for it. Using a knackered rim on a new bar will wreck it though - I've seen x4 I think the last month where the bar has no lasted long at all. One I couldn't figure out what had happened - the chain looked peened and drive bar had a chuck out of it but the sprocket was new... but other x3 were all down to worn drive sprockets or using an old chain on a new bar.

 

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