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Mahogany species

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Looking for opinions about the mahogany species in the attached pictures if anyone can help. The reclaimed timbers are from a staircase my dad made in the mid 1960’s for the house he self built where I grew up. The house has just been demolished to make way for a new care home! Fortunately, although the house was sold on about 25 years ago and I’ve lived 200 miles away for over 35 years, I’d heard about the project and was able to get most of the staircase timbers, about 10 cu ft, so that I can make a few things which will have some sentimental value.

 

There is a bit of colour variation, some timbers are a deeper red than others which are yellowy/orangy red. The end grain and side grain looks similar though. Just wondering if both samples are the same mahogany species with natural colour variation? Or different species? Also, I’m wondering what species they are most likely to be, Honduras, Cuban, Brazilian or from somewhere else?

 

Andrew

Sample 1 end grain.JPG

Sample 1 side grain.JPG

Sample 2 end grain.JPG

Sample 2 side grain.JPG

Samples 1 and 2 side grain.jpg

Stairs.jpg

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The man to ask is @se7enthdevil Steve Earis.  But he doesn't come on here much any more - more's the pity.  Try those details in Arsebook, his main stomping ground I believe

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4 hours ago, nepia said:

The man to ask is @se7enthdevil Steve Earis.  But he doesn't come on here much any more - more's the pity.  Try those details in Arsebook, his main stomping ground I believe

Thanks Nepia. Steve was the first person I thought of when writing the post, so I 'll just wait and see if he spots this thread.

Andrew

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My first thoughts on this are Sapele or Iroko, both used for this kind of project...I've a staircase made of Iroko and in last few years replaced a porch cill with Sapele...both similar to your pictures

if you try cutting with a handsaw, Sapele cuts relatively easy, Iroko a bit harder

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1 minute ago, Ian Leach said:

I would say sapele.

I'm gonna say it too . " Sapele  ". There said it .

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Looks like sapele I reckon. Not sure how long they have been importing Iroko. Yellowing might just be some uv damage from the sun on the varnish or whatever the finish was on it. 

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Thanks for all the comments. Another picture below is four treads after pressure washing to remove the demolition dust and grit. I'd wondered about an African mahogany and some planks have ribbons of twisted grain which is see from several internet sources is found on Sapele. Online pictures of sapele endgrain look similar as well, but I've not checked the spacing/scale of the pores. My dad was pretty good at wood identification so I suspect it is a 'mahogany' of some sort, rather than Iroko. I recall him telling me as a child that he bought it for a good price as mahogany was out of favour for joinery work in the mid 1960's because it was a 'hardwood' and less easy to work with than alternative timbers.

 

Andrew

wet stair treads.JPG

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10 hours ago, muttley9050 said:

I don't think it's sapele but I don't know what it is. Helpful I know.

Thanks Muttley. Lets's hope Steve can make a definite ID.

 

Andrew

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