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Tony Croft aka hamadryad

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Everything posted by Tony Croft aka hamadryad

  1. Nope you have Meripilus on Crateagus which is still awesome as its a new association in my experience.
  2. your absolutely right to want a swift resolution. The decline seems worse on the bankside/tension side not at all good for the prognosis
  3. lol they are top grade wine bottle stoppers!
  4. Olive ash, nope its walnut! teach me to pay more attention! one of my faves.
  5. Thats looking superb Rob, Need another country to the dealer list?
  6. Obviously been a long time but I will begin putting in some time again, especialy now I am heavily involved in the industry once more. I thought I was going to lead a quiet life but the ethers got bigger ideas! P. igniarius on Salix- I. hispidus on Sophoria (new association for me)- P. fraxinea, also on Sophoria again a new association for me.
  7. This is a Pholiotta- associated with an obvious dysfunctional and dead vascular channel indicated by the considerable bark sink. This may develop into a cracked stem and failure.
  8. Totaly agree on Davids comments regarding C. micaceus/domesticus
  9. I would tend toagree with David on this, Maplesare particularly prone to Armillaria, slight stress is enough if present, and it is always around, never very far away. Natures way of dealing with the unsuitable, not fit for the nieghbourhood.
  10. This is a misleading comment (not having a dig) This is indeed Phaeolus but it is not limited to upper/basal areas, in fact quite the opposite, often fruiting from ground in its typical form, from sub surface roots. P schwienitzii is a heart rot fungus limited only to zones of the tree where heartwood exists and transfered (in low resistant species i.e Larix decidua) by root contact. It can be found from the sub surface roots to the upper scaffolds.
  11. These are great images and ive never seen such a population (see holes at guttation points) of the maggots that depend on this fungus, the species of insect I cannot remember right now. some good reading can be had here http://www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk/ancient-trees/ancient-tree-ecology-wildlife/invertebrates/
  12. I suspect this fasciation is caused by a bacterium or fungal most likely former, ash are particularly prone as is forsythia. I once saw a foxglove with it and the flower head was a sight to behold! No chemicals need be implicated at all. Perfectly natural, harmless and actualy on flowering species quite stunning at times
  13. I know nobodies resonded to this one so I will, its not so important to distinguish the species as the ecology, its too degraded for any real posatives but one thing is for sure its a harmless saprobe though obviously feeding on dead woody material so thats all thats critical to know in an arb perspective. hope this helps
  14. a bolete, mycorrhizea and nothing to fear.
  15. its possible being associated with oak this degraded mass is C. fusipes
  16. Why dont you highlight the utter nonsense of what constitutes "useable timber" from whose perspective? as a wood turner and artist ican assure you all that is defined by the "industry" as "useable timber" bortes me to tears! do something on the disconnection between reality and big forestry. theres LOADS of smaller businesses that WANT "low grade lumber"
  17. well apart from agreeing withh our forum guru i would just add it certainly isnt a forming ganoderma, and I never see perenniporia fraxinea on Aesculous so by a simpler process of elimination youll be pretty well on track for R. ulmarius.
  18. yep, and walnuts as common as muck here getting bored of it!
  19. good to see this ones still going, heres a few recents from me
  20. cracking stuff Simon, good to see your at it, should have something to show for the pippy oak soon.

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