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kingfisher46

Advice re 3 trees in our garden

Question

I would be obliged if we could get some advice about trees which were in our garden when we moved in last year. It was winter when we viewed the house and the trees were bare, we didn't notice how big they were until the leaves started appearing! We are in a bungalow and our next door neighbours are bungalows as well. They were built in 2003 and the previous owners of our property must have planted the trees, we don't know when exactly so they are all no more than 18 years old. We've identified one of the trees online as a Tibetan cherry because of the very distinctive and beautiful bark. It is planted right next to the boundary fence with our neighbours behind us and is overhanging in to their garden. We wondered whether it will get any bigger? I measured the circumference of the trunk at the bottom which is 58 inches, I'm not sure if that is relevant information. It's the smallest in height of the three trees but it has a very big crown and wondered what time of the year it should be cut back? Our garden isn't that big and we feel the trees are far too big for the size of it. We also just read online that Tibetan cherry trees are toxic to cats and dogs. We have got a cat and the neighbour whose garden it's overhanging has got two dogs who are outside a lot of the time so that is worrying us. It's a beautiful tree and we want to keep it but if it's going to harm our cat or the neighbour's dogs then we would need to get rid of it. The other two trees are the same variety but we can't identify them online. They are deciduous and have green leaves and variegated leaves. They are both about 25  to 30 feet high, they are next to the perimeter fence with our next door neighbour and are encroaching in to their garden. We would be obliged if anyone could identify them for us and let us know if they will grow any bigger. We will need to get tree surgeons out to look at them if we decide to get them cut back or remove some of them. We'd hate to chop down trees as the birds love them but they are really big and they are all quite close to the house. If we got them all cut back we wondered how quickly they would grow back again as we don't want the expense of tree surgeons every few years. If the Tibetan cherry is poisonous to our cat or the neighbour's dogs then we don't want to keep it. I've attached some photos, thanks for any info anyone can give us. 

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Edited by kingfisher46
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On 09/09/2021 at 20:06, Will C said:

Fell fell the pops they will get much bigger (read more expensive) to do so later. Eco plug to kill or grind out the stumps depending on budget and future plans. If you want to keep them small it will be a ongoing cost.

 

The cherry is a cracker, if it’s not killed any animals yet your fairly safe. If you must prune it do so in summer after it has flowered (look up silver leaf in cherry trees).

Thanks for your reply. Yes I think we will definitely have to fell the poplar trees.  They are in a position where it won't matter if the stumps are left as we won't be planting any other trees or anything else in their place. I presume it is normally cheaper to Eco Plug rather than grind out the stumps?

 

I agree the cherry tree is really beautiful, thank you for the advice about when it should be cut back and I'll look up silver leaf.

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7 hours ago, kingfisher46 said:

Thanks for your reply. Yes I think we will definitely have to fell the poplar trees.  They are in a position where it won't matter if the stumps are left as we won't be planting any other trees or anything else in their place. I presume it is normally cheaper to Eco Plug rather than grind out the stumps?

 

I agree the cherry tree is really beautiful, thank you for the advice about when it should be cut back and I'll look up silver leaf.

Yes poisoning the stumps will be cheaper than grinding them out buy a long way. There are a few options on the market, we use eco plugs due to the low contamination risk to people, pets and wildlife. Your contractor will advise you of their there preferred option and the cost implications of each.

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Yes poisoning the stumps will be cheaper than grinding them out buy a long way. There are a few options on the market, we use eco plugs due to the low contamination risk to people, pets and wildlife. Your contractor will advise you of their there preferred option and the cost implications of each.
You just end up with plastic pollution at the end, but if it's your own garden the pull them out after a few years when the stumps have started to rot.

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12 hours ago, Dan Maynard said:
14 hours ago, Will C said:
Yes poisoning the stumps will be cheaper than grinding them out buy a long way. There are a few options on the market, we use eco plugs due to the low contamination risk to people, pets and wildlife. Your contractor will advise you of their there preferred option and the cost implications of each.

Read more  

You just end up with plastic pollution at the end, but if it's your own garden the pull them out after a few years when the stumps have started to rot.

That is a problem, is it worse than chemical pollution from spraying herbicide on a fresh cut stump? It’s a difficult one to answer.

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14 hours ago, Will C said:

That is a problem, is it worse than chemical pollution from spraying herbicide on a fresh cut stump? It’s a difficult one to answer.

You could always drill, syringe in herbicide and then cap with a wooden plug. Plug cutter sets are cheap enough- probably less than half a dozen eco plugs!

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On 11/09/2021 at 06:49, Will C said:

Yes poisoning the stumps will be cheaper than grinding them out buy a long way. There are a few options on the market, we use eco plugs due to the low contamination risk to people, pets and wildlife. Your contractor will advise you of their there preferred option and the cost implications of each.

We had never heard of eco plugs so have been reading up about them.  We did think it would be the cheaper option after seeing how much they cost.

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On 11/09/2021 at 08:13, Dan Maynard said:
On 11/09/2021 at 06:49, Will C said:
Yes poisoning the stumps will be cheaper than grinding them out buy a long way. There are a few options on the market, we use eco plugs due to the low contamination risk to people, pets and wildlife. Your contractor will advise you of their there preferred option and the cost implications of each.

You just end up with plastic pollution at the end, but if it's your own garden the pull them out after a few years when the stumps have started to rot.

If you can pull them out after a few years that's good to know as we will definitely do that if that is the route we go down to get rid of the stumps.

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On 11/09/2021 at 08:46, rapalaman said:

If you add your location there is likely to be someone reputable on here that can quote and advise

We are in the South West of Scotland in Dumfries. We've been looking online for tree surgeons and can't see that many and one of them looks like they don't cover our area. There's plenty of garden maintenenace/landscaping companies who say they fell trees but we're not keen to use them.

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That is a problem, is it worse than chemical pollution from spraying herbicide on a fresh cut stump? It’s a difficult one to answer.

.

 

 

 

Glyphosate, a common herbicide, (and what's in those Eco plugs I think), breaks down in 24 hours apparently so should not pose a long term problem. That's according to the manufacturers. If that's to be believed, not saying I do entirely, then the plastic in the plugs is much worse. Though obviously insignificant in comparison to the rest of the plastic crap littering the planet already.

 

 

 

 

 

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