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Eat the weeds/foraging


Ty Korrigan
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35 minutes ago, Steven P said:

Always been cautions about mushrooms - finding them takes more energy than you get from them but are a nice thing to add to a meal. Then there are the special ones in the field opposite that love to grow out the cow poo.

I have foraged . Giant puff balls . St Georges mushroom , field mushroom  black berries and sloes . 

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51 minutes ago, Steven P said:

Always been cautions about mushrooms - finding them takes more energy than you get from them but are a nice thing to add to a meal. Then there are the special ones in the field opposite that love to grow out the cow poo.

The little ones with the pointy tops.

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I realised I missed off chestnuts as one of my few regular wild foods which we use for soup with pumpkins.

However at times over half are hosting a maggot so in despair I've binned them and gone for the Supermarket ones instead.

 If I get my act together, I'll give elder flower and berry cordials a go.

In secret, away from Mrs Lee's eyes and nose, maybe brew some parsnip wine.

 

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Oh! I was just chatting with Mrs Lee about foraging in general.

The purslane that popped up in my onions and got weeded out is a Berber favourite.

I got given a hard stare for that but Mrs Lee hasn't exactly been proactive helping me manage the garden.

They make an Autumn/Winter dish from it.

Then she showed me Malva sylvestris and asked if we could grow that as it is again commonly foraged and grown in Morocco.

 

 

 

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We had a field with loads of pignuts in it, too many of them aren't good for you.

As a side note, they were in an old water meadow that was fairly remote, wouldn't have been ploughed by tractor before but had been drained with horseshoe drains. We ploughed it and grew strawberries and cabbage in it before reverting it back to grass. I found a load of worked flints in a small area, seemed pretty obvious that someone had once sat down and knapped a flint there. Maybe they were keen on pignuts and why they were in that area.

It is back to being remote and undisturbed again, I doubt half a dozen folk go in that field a year.

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On 10/08/2023 at 13:48, sime42 said:

 

Reminds me of a story I heard years ago about some guy applying handfuls of nettles to his member, to make it bigger I think. The mind boggles. An urban myth probably, hopefully.

 

Sorry for the late reply. Can now confirm, does not work

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, visiting the UK this week, we took a footpath across fields for a chippy tea and came across Malva sylvestris.

However, Mrs Lee tells me the Malva eaten by her tribe is softer, less woody and no hairs on the stem.

I believe this may be due to 'provinence'

I've observed plant species subtly changing features whilst still being classified as the same species as I have travelled across Europe, NZ, OZ or the USA.

Common hogweed was one notable ubiquitous roadside weed that caught my attention this way.

A great variation in leaf profile observed as I travelled South from Brittany to Spain on velo.

 So I'll try buying the seeds in Morocco though they may not endure the Breton climate.

 

 

Screenshot_2023-08-22-23-13-32-428_com.android.chrome.jpg

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