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Bunzena

Willows Dying Off

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Understand that Willows are often not the most longest lived trees - but we've had a number die-off unexpectedly  this spring. 

 

Common Willow and Goat Willow.  All mature'ish trees [25+ years old].  None are close to each other.  Planted in a variety of habitats [close to water, sheltered, exposed, private land, none adjoining any neighbouring properties].

 

The pattern seems to be the same.  Just as they reach the point of leaf break - they just stop and die.

 

No obvious mechanical damage, no obvious signs of fungus or insect damage. 

 

Slightly disconcerting.  Have I missed any reports of a disease afflicting Willows?

 

Anyone else noticing this?  [We're based in Kent].

 

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49 minutes ago, Bunzena said:

Understand that Willows are often not the most longest lived trees - but we've had a number die-off unexpectedly  this spring. 

 

Common Willow and Goat Willow.  All mature'ish trees [25+ years old].  None are close to each other.  Planted in a variety of habitats [close to water, sheltered, exposed, private land, none adjoining any neighbouring properties].

 

The pattern seems to be the same.  Just as they reach the point of leaf break - they just stop and die.

 

No obvious mechanical damage, no obvious signs of fungus or insect damage. 

 

Slightly disconcerting.  Have I missed any reports of a disease afflicting Willows?

 

Anyone else noticing this?  [We're based in Kent].

 

I haven't noticed anything up here, the climate is a bit different though.
Have you got any pics?

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41 minutes ago, Mark J said:

I haven't noticed anything up here, the climate is a bit different though.
Have you got any pics?

Two pictures of the Goat Willow.

 

There's no die-back - they just die.  Sudden and completely. 

 

The only thing I have seen that's in any way comparable is Phytopthera - but then there's often some peripheral die back before the tree succumbs.

 

You can see that this particular tree is one the edge of water.  No other plants or trees nearby have been affected.

 

As we all know - the weather this season has been weird.  We had quite heavy frosts up to the third week of May and a very, very dry spring.  But we've had colder weather and drier spells before.

 

All the trees affected were healthy last year and showed no signs of distress.

 

 

 

Close Up - Bud Break.PNG

IMG_0096.JPG

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24 minutes ago, Bunzena said:

Two pictures of the Goat Willow.

 

There's no die-back - they just die.  Sudden and completely. 

 

The only thing I have seen that's in any way comparable is Phytopthera - but then there's often some peripheral die back before the tree succumbs.

 

You can see that this particular tree is one the edge of water.  No other plants or trees nearby have been affected.

 

As we all know - the weather this season has been weird.  We had quite heavy frosts up to the third week of May and a very, very dry spring.  But we've had colder weather and drier spells before.

 

All the trees affected were healthy last year and showed no signs of distress.

 

 

 

Close Up - Bud Break.PNG

IMG_0096.JPG

That is peculiar. I'm going down to Kent next week so I'll keep my eyes open.

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Nope, nothing like that,  here, Wisleys Willows look good again ( but they get very good care)  k

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Haven't noticed willow dieback here in East Sussex - I'm targetting the gorse 😂  (Hope you understand the in joke)

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That ones on the edge of water, but can it get any of it? If it's a good pond liner that could be a really well drained spot which is pretty dry as no chance to puddle.

Thinking maybe the cold and the dry.

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I have one which has died - very mature, around 80ft tall, 3ft dbh. It has been a bit unstable for years and leaning on the adjacent sycamores. It did move a bit more this winter but not enough to have lost any major roots. Just started to leaf out and then died. We have a lot more willows around here of various types - none of them seem to have been affected.

 

Alec

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1 hour ago, Dan Maynard said:

That ones on the edge of water, but can it get any of it? If it's a good pond liner that could be a really well drained spot which is pretty dry as no chance to puddle.

Thinking maybe the cold and the dry.

It's a good thought - but the pond isn't lined - so this one is not short of water.

 

And another - a Common Willow that has died is right on the edge of another pond.

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Got one here, big goat willow on edge of pond, 20 ish years old and no changes I can think of and certainly nothing it hasn't experienced before without being harmed. I was surprised and even more surprised when you say you have some doing similar.

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