Jump to content
william petts

The woodsure scheme, do we need it?

Recommended Posts

53 minutes ago, renewablejohn said:

But the legislation does not say delivery it says supply which could mean contracted to supply 2m3 but delivered in 2 x 1m3 drops maybe a month apart. If the customer has ordered and paid for 2m3 I cannot see why the customer is dictated to having the full 2m3 delivered all at once. Think the lawyers will have a field day with this.

I doubt contract to supply will be allowed.

 

The intent is they season it if delivered in 2m3+ loads.

 

If you are still delivering in small loads that does not hold much water.

 

Do you want to be the test case for us all?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, woody paul said:

At least that letter will save writing something up and even supply it with every load so pass the problem to buyer. 

Always deliver 3cube loads. 

True but the letter is designed to put clients off.

Who wants to buy a load that needs to be seasoned for 2 years?

Should just say needs seasoning till its 20%.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Justme said:

True but the letter is designed to put clients off.

Nothing stopping you writing your own letter explaining the situation is there? Just add the official one whilst pointing out how daft it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Paul in the woods said:

Nothing stopping you writing your own letter explaining the situation is there? Just add the official one whilst pointing out how daft it is.

 

 

If I ever have to comply that would be my plan.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess you can print the required words on the inv. ie do not burn until 20% moisture etc etc, measure moisture with customer and note on inv. if they were genuinely 19% i guess they could burn right away ? are they talking wet basis, dry basis, or average moisture, or oven dry, i regularly see 28% in the middle but then zero on the outer, 10% about an inch in, 19% at two inch in, if i leave them stand then over a bit of time they even out, but the point is that even a log with 28% for an inch in the middle could be 15% when worked out on oven dry method, no one seems to know, and for that reason iam out !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Paul in the woods said:

Nothing stopping you writing your own letter explaining the situation is there? Just add the official one whilst pointing out how daft it is.

Here is my invoice template to deal with the situation:

 

Supply and deliver 2 cubic metres of unseasoned hardwood logs.

This is my advice about the logs:

These logs are not ready for burning and need to be dried until the moisture content is 20 per cent or lower.

They need to be stored with good ventilation, the more air flow the better. Moisture meters are readily available to buy online for a few pounds.

This is the “official” advice about unseasoned logs:
This wood is not suitable for burning until it has been dried. You should not burn wood until it has a moisture content of 20% or less.

Wet wood contains moisture which creates smoke and harmful particulates when burnt. As well as being harmful to your health and the environment, this can damage your stove and chimney and is an inefficient way to heat your home. Dry it in a sunny, well-aired space for at least two years, keeping rain off in the winter.

Radial cracks and bark that comes off easily suggests wood that is ready for burning. Test the wood when you think it is ready for burning, ideally with a moisture meter. First calibrate the meter and then measure a freshly split surface to get the best reading.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, maybelateron said:

Moisture meters are readily available to buy online for a few pounds

Has anyone found a meter that reads moisture  percentage on a wet basis yet?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, openspaceman said:

Has anyone found a meter that reads moisture  percentage on a wet basis yet?

The Dolmar MD812 moisture meter is designed to measure water in wood within in range of 5% to 40%. Put it in water and it measured 40% put it in seasoned birch now indoors which was cut/split and kept dry since spring 2020 and that came out at 20%, measured moisture content of pine table in a very dry room and came out at 10%. Its the second one we've had and it has a resolution of 1%, the we had before was a small Stihl meter which has a resolution of 2%.  Accurate enough I find to give some indication as to whether wood ready to burn but operating temp is 0-40 degrees C and RH 0-70% , the humidity today is 78-90% and RH probably hasn't been below 70% since summer so unlikely to get a prefect reading outside this time of year with this device.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Vedhoggar said:

The Dolmar MD812 moisture meter is designed to measure water in wood within in range of 5% to 40%. Put it in water and it measured 40% put it in seasoned birch now indoors which was cut/split and kept dry since spring 2020 and that came out at 20%, measured moisture content of pine table in a very dry room and came out at 10%. Its the second one we've had and it has a resolution of 1%, the we had before was a small Stihl meter which has a resolution of 2%.  Accurate enough I find to give some indication as to whether wood ready to burn but operating temp is 0-40 degrees C and RH 0-70% , the humidity today is 78-90% and RH probably hasn't been below 70% since summer so unlikely to get a prefect reading outside this time of year with this device.

That doesn't actually answer my question until you dry the sample in an oven and calculate the moisture content.

 

Please try adding some salt to the water before you test it again.

 

Logs coming in from my store seem to be at 16% and I suspect most moisture meters would give a reading of 20%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

That doesn't actually answer my question until you dry the sample in an oven and calculate the moisture content.

 

Please try adding some salt to the water before you test it again.

 

Logs coming in from my store seem to be at 16% and I suspect most moisture meters would give a reading of 20%

Two table spoons of salt to 1/4 water same reading 40%. Will try drying a sample in oven sometime. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Featured Adverts

  • Tip site reviews

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.