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The Wee Chipper Club

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2 minutes ago, nepia said:

A q for @Pete B or @GA Groundcare perhaps.  Just how sensitive are wee chippers (Jo Beau M300) to the grind angle on the blades?

I fitted newly sharpened blades this morning and the machine just won't drag any material in.  I've played with the anvil gap (I set it narrow to start with)) but no difference.  Having now whipped the blades off again and compared them to the blunt set they replaced I can see that the upper face angle is maybe 3 or 4 degrees wider than on the blunt ones.  You can see that the bad blades weren't ground back as far as before.

Hopefully this is the cause of the lack of performance (along with the fact that the wrong 'uns aren't actually that sharp!)  If not I'm a bit stuck.

The likelihood is I'll send the bad blades back for a free re-sharpen and the blunt ones will go to GA Groundcare cos you're cheap!!!

 

Thanks,

 

Jon


Blade angle on a gravity machine is everything as the blade is technically your “feed roller” too. 


A CS at a few degrees out won’t feed. 

 

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Might as well buy the TW 13/75 at nearly the same price and weight, only one blade to sharpen also. I have one, fantastic for chipping under 80mm.

Yeah - my only worry with the 13/75 is will it cope with forkfuls of (e.g) beech hedge clippings chucked in it? I’ve had not wonderful experiences with larger rowed chippers with this sort of stuff. A shredder with hammers isn’t going to have that problem...
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When I've done shrub bashing or hedge cutting outside my own place, I run over it with a mower! Anything that is woody, I chop that out and chuck it in the recycling garden waste bin, the rest gets run over several times until it gets blown into the bag and that gets added to the grass clippings and again, lobbed int garden waste bin! works a treat! 
 
If you do do this on the lawn, it can damage the grass if done to hard or vigorously - but a good watering afterwards can help.

Honestly this might be the easiest option...

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25 minutes ago, ghostwheel said:


Honestly this might be the easiest option...

Bit of volume reduction, easier to 'hoover' up the residuals, cheap to buy or sharpen a blade that hits a bit of gravel etc, and you can get it down the back garden without a drag etc.

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Yeah - my only worry with the 13/75 is will it cope with forkfuls of (e.g) beech hedge clippings chucked in it? I’ve had not wonderful experiences with larger rowed chippers with this sort of stuff. A shredder with hammers isn’t going to have that problem...

Rowed? TOWED!

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The only thing I would change about my TW 13/75 is the funnel which is too small. Hedges keep getting stuck in it but if it was wider then it would be a dream to use. I spend half my time ramming a post down it to release the blockage. On the other hand if I just took my time then everything would be fine. ?

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On 15/10/2020 at 21:54, Ty Korrigan said:

Dinan, technically Lanvalley down by the port. 

A long narrow garden whose access was via a slippery alleyway and half a dozen granite steps.

The budget Chinesium chippette has 2 days to chew through thuya hedging, bay laurels, blue cypress, apple watershoots and what ever else the client points her purse at.

The weird cutting out issue traced to a badly wired stop switch and the safety switch (now disabled) on the folding infeed.

The one way street has a junction to the left of the bollard and further bollards making the parking of a truck and chipper plus pile of brash without first seeking permission from the town hall a logistical nightmare as it is also a mini-bus route with larger delivery trucks passing.

 So Chinesium Chippette was the way forward. 

We put 3 hours to the tenth of an hour on it today and feel rather exhausted.

  Stuart

 

 

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Wots that blue flappy thing i can see ?? K

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50 minutes ago, Khriss said:

Wots that blue flappy thing i can see ?? K

It is a Protosser accessory.

Clips in the back of the helmet and prevents merde from dropping down your neck.

Very usefull for preventing climbers scat thrown from above from hitting my neck when working with Luckyeleven.

He often rages and rants in the tree, like a rabid howler monkey especially on Fridays around 3pm.

 True that.

    Stuart

 

 

 

 

 

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