Jump to content
Sam0207

hard chains

Recommended Posts

firstly thank you to this group for pointing me in the right direction in the past, i am always keen to learn as i go along.

 

I sharpen quite a lot of different peoples saws (or show them how to sharpen their own) and recently, on 2 occasions, i have come across chains that i cannot sharpen with a file, they are just too hard. I suspect they have been sharpened with a power tool previously and i am wondering if that has somehow re-hardened the cutter into something that my files, even a new file, cannot get in to?

 

i don't think that these are extra hard chains, they look standard enough to my eye however they are both makes i have never heard of before. the one in question at the moment has no manufacturers name but 3 joining rings stamped on it that slightly resemble the Olympic games logo. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated to expand on my knowledge.

 

Sam

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I’m guessing they’ve been run blunt and have ‘work hardened’


Ie. The metal has changed temper because of the heat.

 

Chuck them away.

Edited by Mick Dempsey
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Mick Dempsey said:

Well, I’m guessing they’ve been run blunt and have ‘work hardened’


Ie. The metal has change temper because of the heat.

 

Chuck them away.

This . You can get past the work hardened edge but it takes a lot of effort and you will loose fair proportion of the cutter . As Mick says , bin 'em .

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they are carbide tipped, you can't sharpen that with steel.

If you've got a proper bench grinder you can take the teeth back behind the hardened crap to soft metal.

Or as I find it's only one or two teeth on a huge chain I just grind them off.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A while ago one of my 4ft chains for the 880 got overheated when it found some metal. It was a fairly new chain, so didn't want to chuck it away. As Rough Hewn suggests, I took it to out local Stihl agent who I have a good working relationship with. They touched it enough with the grinder to remove the hardened edge, but gently enough not to overheat it again. I then finished the sharpening with a file.

If the chain had been more than half way through its life I might have binned it.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ChainS are carbon steel, which gives a sharper edge ( and keeps it longer than stainless steel -ask any butcher which blade he prefers ) but it will harden when heated too much. K

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Khriss said:

ChainS are carbon steel, which gives a sharper edge ( and keeps it longer than stainless steel -ask any butcher which blade he prefers ) but it will harden when heated too much. K

Soften surely, unless quenched after the heating, with natural slow cooling after heat, that would be tempering, or annealing.

Btw, I understand "work hardening" to be due to "hammering", or repeated mechanical stress cycles, not due to heat.

From memories of Copper work in school, peening, or planishing, then required annealing to soften the copper.

Edited by difflock
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, difflock said:

Soften surely, unless quenched after the heating?

Doesn't seem to  😯 air quenching is enuff. Tiny parts cool faster . Gentle with yr grinder is best, I use cutting grade discs as they softer / larger grit and remove more metal without cooking the tooth. The pink honing disc is harder / finer grit which IS best ( in the right hands ) k

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.