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The key with long life is keeping moisture out when the stove is either not in use or is being used in a fully shutdown mode all the while. Rust setting up inside a cast iron stove is a death sentence as the rust gets between sides, back and top and forces them apart usually breaking the castings in the process.   Steel stoves with bodies formed from a single piece are better able to resist this.  Life,  I have sold spares for inherited Morso's that are 45 years old and still going strong.   

 

A

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On 17/07/2019 at 08:02, Alycidon said:

The key to long life is preventative maintenance and keeping moisture out when the stove is either not in use or is being used in a fully shutdown mode all the while. Rust setting up inside a cast iron stove is a death sentence as the rust gets between sides, back and top and forces them apart usually breaking the castings in the process.   Steel stoves with bodies formed from a single piece are better able to resist this.  Life,  I have sold spares for inherited Morso's that are 45 years old and still going strong.   

 

A

 

Edited by Alycidon
Please delete, posted twice, thanks

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Had a rayburn no.2 which i believe was 1940s. It was still working well just didnt produce enough hot water for rads. Not a single crack in any of the castings. Proper job that.

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Makes sense to me that they last well if built well.  If you aren't stupid, run them hot but not over fired, keep the bricks good and the door seals good, feed it dry wood, sit back and relax.

 

I I've thought before, should I do anything special over the summer?  I usually Hoover it out after sweeping the flue but then I have done the sweep a bit early and had another fire or two some years. I then just leave it with vents open so it breathes.  My lined flue has a cowl on the top so little rain shouldn't get in but air flow always feels right to keep moisture at bay.  Does anybody bother with anything more?  A squirt of light oil or other water repellant for example?

Edited by neiln
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I oil the outside of mine, and open the door every so often to help the air move a bit. (Leave the vents at least half open, as you say).

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You oil the outside?  I guess it's stove black/polish finish not painted or enameled?  Does it smoke when you next fire it up?  I had been thinking solely about the inside and whether a couple of squirts of wd40 would help.

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Yep! Not totally sure on finish actually, but stove installer recommended WD40 rather than expensive stove cleaners / oils as it does the same job. Seems to work well. I only put a little bit on and wipe it around the surface, and I don't then light the stove for a month or two, so no, it doesn't smoke that I've noticed. There was a patch of rust starting where a stove fan got put on top of the metalwork when it was a bit damp, the oil seems to keep this at bay.

As for putting oil inside, I don't know. Not sure it would be good to get oil in fire bricks etc.? Wiping it carefully on the metalwork might be OK, but I wouldn't then light the fire for a while, and maybe open the door to let the volatiles out.

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