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tlk

Retraining to work as a tree surgeon

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1 hour ago, trigger_andy said:

How fit are you? I cant imagine and internet sales type job being very physical so I assume you'll be going to the gym regularly? Even if you are I think you'd get a wake up call as to hard and physically demanding Tree work is. You'll be wearing you body out at an age where people are already at the top of their game and have their tickets, tools, contacts and knowledge already in place, in an already over saturated market. By the time you even get remotely close to that you'll be a broken man. 

 

If you're still really keen Id suggest taking a 2 week holiday from work and do the two weeks working with a crew and get them to run you as hard as they would if you where actually working for them and then see how you feel about it all. One day here and there is just a jolly and would mean nothing. 

Thanks for the advice on trying out a longer stretch for a trial. I am sure it would be a wake up call I am not doubting that. I run regularly and do some marathons so am fit in that sense rather than being a gym nut so would hopefully help in some regards.

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2 minutes ago, Conor Wright said:

High wages in a high cost environment can end up the same as an average wage away from the hustle and bustle. 

If you can afford to give it a go, by all means do.. beats asking yourself "what if?" In the future. If it works it works if not it ain't for ya.

Absolutely and that was one of the reason for moving back to Norfolk. 

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Heres the thing for me.When i started as a chainsaw "operative" i loved tree work.I come from a gardening back ground so i was used to the physical side of the job.I didnt start climbing until i was in my mid thirties but i loved it at first.

As the years go on you see the down sides,biggest one for me is weather.

Climbing a slimey bastard sycamore in the pissin wet having tree juice running down your arm is not great fun.

You go home,stinking,proper stinking.

Then theres the summer when your just constantly sweating like a fat kid in a cake shop and pissing fanta cause your so dehydrated.

Draggin cuttings through dog shit infested gardens,dealing with prick customers,the list goes on.

Bright side.

When everything clicks and you get your first proper climb,you've learned to trust your gear,you can get out on limbs, you take your first big swing,you knock a 20 foot top of a spruce,working with a great team who make you laugh till you piss yourself....its an amazing job it really is.

Its dangerous,you have a family,so take time to consider that.

The pay to work ratio is lousy.

For some its a calling

For others its just a job

If you get into this industry be aware of its downfalls but it could be the best decision you ever made.

Good luck which ever way you chose to go mate

 

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12 hours ago, tlk said:

Absolutely and that was one of the reason for moving back to Norfolk. 

To be honest Norfolk is a pretty much saturated market with plenty of subbies and new apprentice entrants looking for work .

 

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7 minutes ago, Philip Anderson said:

To be honest Norfolk is a pretty much saturated market with plenty of subbies and new apprentice entrants looking for work .

 

I was just referring to Conor's point about 'High wages in a high cost environment can end up the same as an average wage away from the hustle and bustle' rather than specifically moving to Norfolk for tree work but that is worth knowing, thanks.     

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20 hours ago, trigger_andy said:

How fit are you? I cant imagine and internet sales type job being very physical so I assume you'll be going to the gym regularly? Even if you are I think you'd get a wake up call as to hard and physically demanding Tree work is. You'll be wearing you body out at an age where people are already at the top of their game and have their tickets, tools, contacts and knowledge already in place, in an already over saturated market. By the time you even get remotely close to that you'll be a broken man. 

 

If you're still really keen Id suggest taking a 2 week holiday from work and do the two weeks working with a crew and get them to run you as hard as they would if you where actually working for them and then see how you feel about it all. One day here and there is just a jolly and would mean nothing. 

get yourself into a handcutting job, line thinning or select for a week or two,it will either get your fitness up to spec or think about another line of work.either way the very best of luck to you.

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19 hours ago, Dan Maynard said:

it does seem like firms struggle to recruit good people so if you are reliable and hardworking there is a good chance you will get on.

This part is most certainly true. If you are a good worker you will always find work easy in this trade regardless of your skillset 

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I know two guys who trained in their fifties.
(Climbing)
Worked with both of them.
Great guys.
The skill sets/problem solving they bring along extra are priceless.
I've also known guys in their twenties who can't hack it.
I'd never climbed until last year, after over ten years of arb.
Got 20' up and to my surprise, my balls shrank into a super miniature black hole and I prussiced back down.
I can climb, but not above about 6'.
Try it before you go full bore.
Personally. I'll never do anything else.

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I started late and feel like I've got a new lease of life. Lucky enough to work with a great team which is well resourced. There'll always be niggles and bad days but far outweighed by the great ones, nothing quite like being up in the canopy of a mature tree (as long as it's not a monkey puzzle). I've probably added years to my life and don't fear the strokes and other issues laying waste to my office/car bound contempories. The best bit is looking forward to the day rather than dreading the same old issues coming round again and again.

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Seems to be a lot of negative replies on here. I changed career aged 36. I turn 40 in a couple of months. Absolutely love my work and running my own business being my own boss. It’s no harder than starting out in anything else that is a radical change for you and is a start up. You will need a period of time gaining experience which will be low pay so if you can ride that out go for it. I have one regular guy and a pool of decent guys I get in. When I think to how much I disliked my old career before I left and think to finishing my fridays like this yesterday I’m glad I made the change. I’m probably too far from you but you are welcome to come and test the water anytime. All the best with your decision. If you need advice I’m more than happy to help.
FC09F996-A75B-4D4A-B039-E4393430198C.jpgIMG_3667.jpgIMG_3671.jpg

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