Jump to content
RC0

Hazard Tree take downs

Recommended Posts

Great work Reg.

 

I bet you slept well after working in those woods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More pant-staining stuff Reg.

That split top looked particularly nasty.

 

Why were the trees in such a state? Just age?

 

Loved the way you didn't rub it in about your mate's stumble at all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty amazing how you get them dead tops to go over.

Is this your most dangerous job yet.

you spoil us with your brilliant videos .

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Mark Bolam said:

More pant-staining stuff Reg.

That split top looked particularly nasty.

 

Why were the trees in such a state? Just age?

 

Loved the way you didn't rub it in about your mate's stumble at all!

Just age and characteristics I think mate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Rich Rule said:

Great work Reg.

 

I bet you slept well after working in those woods.

I never sleep good to be honest Rich. Climbing up hills all day with your gear is a bit if a shock to the lungs at first....but after a few days you start being able to suck in bigger breaths and the legs get stronger. Great place to work. Great drive in through the mountains and views every day

 

20190308_194406.jpg

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Darrin Turnbull said:

Pretty amazing how you get them dead tops to go over.

Is this your most dangerous job yet.

you spoil us with your brilliant videos .

 

Its dangerous work because the state of the trees obviously....like dead, rotten, hollow, split, leaning etc. Often hard to read which way they're weighted because we're on a slope. Often hard to make your cuts into any sort of reliable hingwood that aligns with where you want to aim the tree. Sometimes they start to sink and trap your saw just trying to cut the face. Sometimes instead of tipping the tree, the wedges just start splitting the already knackered wood apart....not a good feeling. Barberchairs and widowmakers never far from your mind. Have to spend quite a bit of time cutting and prepping escape routes....and even then they still inadequate. A major worry too was the HV lines down on the road, and the risk of a tree cartwheeling down hill and right through them. Aside from the danger of electrocution of the construction workers down below, it wouldve put 2 towns out of electricity, and we would've been thrown off the job facing massive fines. So, a few heartstopping moments came and passed throughout.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reg , did you have to clear up any on the road below  ? . One of those looked to be tumbling close .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.