Jump to content
mac2

Best/Fastest seasoning of firewood

Recommended Posts

On 1/5/2018 at 15:34, Haironyourchest said:

A tip from the Norwegian Wood Firewood Book - (though maybe not relevant to your set up) - is don't buck up the tree straight away, leave it lying with the branches and leaves on for three weeks before processing. The leaves continue to draw moisture out of the wood through the capillary system before they whither and die, and can speed the curing time by several months. Works better with broadleaf trees, but conifers do this too.

This is known as sour felling and was effective on heathland clearance prior to sending chip to Slough heat and power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/5/2018 at 12:27, richardwale said:

Hi, interested in pictures and prices please, thanks

Richard the advert is on arbtrader with some pictures now.

 

If you want to go down and look at it before it is drained down I can pick you up one morning. If we can find some one trip  pallets we may be able to fire it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5.1.2018 at 16:34, Haironyourchest said:

A tip from the Norwegian Wood Firewood Book - (though maybe not relevant to your set up) - is don't buck up the tree straight away, leave it lying with the branches and leaves on for three weeks before processing. The leaves continue to draw moisture out of the wood through the capillary system before they whither and die, and can speed the curing time by several months. Works better with broadleaf trees, but conifers do this too.

Oh God.

They have translated the book then?

A collection of random bollocks collated by a Norwegian Journalist with heavy nationalist leanings marketed towards urban hipsters with Custom Axe collections,neck beards and Audi Quatros.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Mike Hill said:

Oh God.

They have translated the book then?

A collection of random bollocks collated by a Norwegian Journalist with heavy nationalist leanings marketed towards urban hipsters with Custom Axe collections,neck beards and Audi Quatros.

...triggered?🇳🇴🌲🌳⛄🔫🔫?

Edited by Haironyourchest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going back to the original topic, we currently sell kiln died only. If we wanted to sell air dried and get it down to a usable moisture content of sub 25% what is the best way to do this on a large scale?

Forgetting the actual final moisture content: Over say 12 months will logs dry quicker if left in the round for 6 months then processed into vented bags/ibc’s/potato crates, stacked in a Yorkshire boarded shed.

Or processed after 2 months and then stored for 10?

Are they more likely to mould one way over the other?

Alternatively do logs dry as well (without getting mouldy) tipped loose into a concrete floored and sided bay in the same yorkshire boarded shed as before?

Would some sort of grain pedestal or fan at the back behind a cage to keep the air flow moving through them speed up drying?

I would assume cutting the logs during a dry period when they are themselves dry outside would be the best option for a start?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fastest we have found is individual IBC with hats on. Snag is that need loads of space so compromise by making blocks of 30 of then stacked 2 x3x5 with gaps between the 3 rows. Tarp over the tops. 12 months in IBC and a well ventilated space is more than enough even with green wood. If the wood has been seasoned in the round it can cut down drying time a fair bit but a bit species dependant. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fastest we have found is individual IBC with hats on. Snag is that need loads of space so compromise by making blocks of 30 of then stacked 2 x3x5 with gaps between the 3 rows. Tarp over the tops. 12 months in IBC and a well ventilated space is more than enough even with green wood. If the wood has been seasoned in the round it can cut down drying time a fair bit but a bit species dependant. 


Sounds good, whatever we do it needs to be economical on space. Another option is to fill IBC’s and stack in 3443 or 343 columns as long as we can go in the space I have between sheds. Then tarp the top. Maybe even put pallets on the top to stop damage to the tarp and allow more airflow under the tarp.

The only trouble is that means more double handling, we deliver in bags so if we could stack those in a similar arrangement that would be fantastic.
Might only get a safe stack 3 high in the middle though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/11/2018 at 17:44, SbTVF said:

 


Sounds good, whatever we do it needs to be economical on space. Another option is to fill IBC’s and stack in 3443 or 343 columns as long as we can go in the space I have between sheds. Then tarp the top. Maybe even put pallets on the top to stop damage to the tarp and allow more airflow under the tarp.

The only trouble is that means more double handling, we deliver in bags so if we could stack those in a similar arrangement that would be fantastic.
Might only get a safe stack 3 high in the middle though.

 

4 high on level ground is fine, providing you don't use IBCs with pallet bases.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Posch PackFix hydro.  Very, very happy with it.  

Processing Oak and seasoning 12 months.  Eliminates stacking labor and seeing much better seasoning results.  

Typically Oak is slow to season, and much improved at 2 years.  

This does exceptionally well with at one year.  Easy handling on pallets.  I do cover individually, and loosely, with 6' x 6' tarps, corners folded and stitched with twine run through them.  

Four pallets per cord (cutting 16" lengths and splitting small for stove wood), so it takes a little more space with pallets.  Can be double stacked if top row is staggered, one on top of two for a more stable foot print, but sometimes difficult to pick off with forks after seasoning/settling (my lift does not have side tilt like some tele handlers).  Saugatuck, Michigan, USAIMG_5610.thumb.jpg.7c9c8116a02759f3f2ce095abf8dad54.jpg 

Edited by sandhill
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_3617.thumb.jpg.b5ebbedccc28124a70240f41ebbb97cf.jpg

I found this old photo to share. 

Takes some effort, on and off the lift several times to level the lowers units, to get them to nest this nicely.  I've discovered too that there is considerable difference in pallet construction, and soft wood, or light weight pallets do not work as well. They, the pallets, sag and the lower cross boards deform upwards when used on the top row.  I have tipped a few trying to get forks back in these soft wood pallets after sitting a year, and more often then not, when that happens, the lower supporting bundles tip and break as well.  A bit of extra work is all, to pick up and rebundle.  

I did not double stack this year.  Possibly next year if room is tight.  The second photo shows where I changed from stacking one pallet on top of the one below, to staggering one on top of two.  This worked better.

The small amount of loose thrown per pallet and good air flow is optimal for seasoning even without covering (prior to using this system I have had issues with moldy wood some years).  Loosely covering the tops seems to help even more of course to shed weeks of on/off spring rain and  winter snow.  The upper rows patina from the sun, the lower rows remain pale, but dry and season just as well.  I have never used a moisture meter, so I have no numbers to share.5a60e6bd5fc25_IMG_4766(1).thumb.jpg.17aa80194187e123f5a1cf0f1a09be7b.jpg

Edited by sandhill
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×