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Phil_G

New to the arb industry - looking for advice

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Hi all,

 

Quick Intro; I'm a 28yr old who is considering entering the trade, I'm from Liverpool in the UK and I drive. Currently working as a Biomedical Scientist and a Cancer Research Support Technician at the University of Liverpool.

 

I have been reading around the different aspects of the arborist/tree surgeon roles and would like to push to becoming a climber within the next 12 months. I have whittled it down to two education centres that would be applicable and cost effective for what I want, these being, the course offered by http://www.kingswoodtraining.com which is 4 weeks and http://proclimber.co.uk which is 6 weeks. As proclimber is in Wales and cover more topics it seems like the ideal fast track for me, I was wondering if anyone thought differently? Looking at these types of courses from your experience what have the people who have entered your workplace been like after only having completed one of these types of courses?

 

I was also wondering if anyone in the North West region of the UK has any contacts that they would recommend as most of the people I have been in touch with are not willing to take on someone due to apprentice commitments. If anyone from around the country or even Europe has any contacts I would consider the journey I would just have to book time off work.

 

Any information will be greatly appreciated

 

Just to add, I have a background in climbing but only in the recreational rock climbing sense, however I am very fit cardio wise and have considerable upper body strength. Would you suggest training to ensure that the 6 weeks are not hindered by fatigue?

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this thread.

Would love to hear back from you guys!

 

Take Care,

 

Phil

 

 

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Work your legs as well  bud . Get on the stepper for a bit maybe do some squats . 

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Hi Phil,

 

Both those training centers have a good reputation in the industry, either will be a good choice.

 

What will you walk away with after the 4-6 weeks though?  Certificates, that is all.  You will still be green as green, then the real learning will begin.  Just don't turn up to work for a new company thinking you are ready to jump in to anything, be honest about your experience(or lack of).  That is one of the most annoying things I come accross, new climbers bigging themselves up in the interview, only to fail rapidly when put to test.

 

I doubt you will be overly taxed physically on your course so I shouldn't be too worried, you're certainly not going to be doing the work of a production climber.  Being fit helps sure, but

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Just help me out here, so you have a masters (at the very minimum) in biomedical research and you want to go do a 6 week course to become a climber for a tuppence and get ragged around trees in all weathers?
Am I missing something here? I have a friend in the same field who is on a very very good packet, a packet you will never see in this industry as an employee.

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if you want to work in this game buy a tree firm and get other people to bust their b**ls for you, its the only way to make any money in this game!

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@Stubby Thanks for the advice, my legs are pretty weak to be honest!

 

@Steve Bullman Thank you for the honesty. I think my attitude is pretty good with regards to how I would enter the workplace. I would try to see it as a constant learning process and respect the depth of experience of the people I get a chance to work with.

 

@SWORDSTA That's about right, I don't feel challenged in lab work especially. The money is great but there is a lot of politics and limitations that get in the way. I'm kind of an exercise, adrenaline junkie that has always pursued outdoor activities. I'm a bit of a safety nut too which might come in handy. You mention weather, this is kind of what I want to do it for, I think being outside in weather is a part of what I want even in the cold and wet. I've been considering looking into going to Norway as well once I have enough experience to land something over there, so I presume it would be worse up there! My company would be nice too in the distant future.

 

@flatyre I am a grafter and have that sort of work ethic so busting my balls is something I enjoy doing.

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I entered at 25 and did the extended diploma in arboriculture at Sparsholt college it's a fulltime 2-year course. It gives you a lot of knowledge that some guys working for ten years+ don't have. I was skint as and worked as a part-time groundy then 2nd climber for two years whilst attending.

However, there is nothing like actual work experience. Even with all the knowledge and tickets it takes 2 years just getting to a good and profitable working standard.

The deeper understanding you get from the L3 is a great advantage and sets you up for the future if you're in it for the longterm. It also helps you get to places like NZ,oz and canada if you're interested. 

I started as a subby climber for different companies as soon as I finished college and my wage went up relatively quickly as my technique and confidence improved.

If you're already fit you won't need to train but might be beneficial. You will get fitter at work and what really matters in climbing is technique.

I was asking about doing the 10-week course, L2  1 yr or L3 before I went back to college and I'm very glad I went for the highest level qualification. I doubt my progression through the industry would have been so quick without it.

 

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If you are fit, intelligent and with money behind you, then buy van, small chipper, some saws and make up a tree company name, stick it on the side, get some insurance and give it a go. We are not regulated as a trade, you don't need tickets for insurance, learn as you go, build up to bigger stuff and bobs your uncle.
Once you realise how simple this job is Conny bashing in back gardens then do some climbing tickets for peace of mind and work hard.
Good luck!

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If you are fit, intelligent and with money behind you, then buy van, small chipper, some saws and make up a tree company name, stick it on the side, get some insurance and give it a go. We are not regulated as a trade, you don't need tickets for insurance, learn as you go, build up to bigger stuff and bobs your uncle.
Once you realise how simple this job is Conny bashing in back gardens then do some climbing tickets for peace of mind and work hard.
Good luck!



I'd say do a ten week course at a minimum, it was invaluable to me, intelligence means absolutely nothing if you want to try stay safe but haven't been shown the hazards, like bio mechanical Weaknesses, various types of decay and fungi etc..

I'd say an individual with a background in biomedical research doing dirty back yard connies would want to kill himself after two months, I know I did.

As for the tickets, in truth they don't mean much really, you can get assessed in a day and that's that, however I'm fairly sure if you drop a tree through someone's house without tickets you may be in a bit of bother, I may be wrong.

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