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Alexandr Fedoseev

Fail. Sling crash.

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I think you would be surprised how often slings break all the big firms involved in steal construction don't use them.

I no it's quick but for anything of weight I'd be sticking to the chains all on the crane firm then.

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I think you would be surprised how often slings break all the big firms involved in steal construction don't use them.

I no it's quick but for anything of weight I'd be sticking to the chains all on the crane firm then.

 

I found slings much slow than chains which are quick to attach and then adjust.

I guess being steel they have a better cycle to fail rate, all our crane slings (used only in tree planting and with our hiab for lighter crane removals, are retired after a year sometimes they may only do a few lifts, they are cheap failures are not!

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I found slings much slow than chains which are quick to attach and then adjust.

I guess being steel they have a better cycle to fail rate, all our crane slings (used only in tree planting and with our hiab for lighter crane removals, are retired after a year sometimes they may only do a few lifts, they are cheap failures are not!

That's a great way to think about it. To many people in ours and probably other industries push things as far as possible before replacement.

 

Sent from my HTC One using Arbtalk mobile app

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Bet that gave you a shock ! Don't suppose there is LOLER in Russia ? In the UK well last crane company I used they refused to let us work with our own slings despite being brand new and brought for the job.

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Out of interest why was a crane being used since everything was being put at the bottom of the tree, and those pieces all looked lowerable?

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Hmmh. In the offshore industry, chains are never used for lifting and rigging purposes. And for good reason....difficult to inspect properly without use of specialist non destructive testing techniques. Webbing and round slings are used a lot. But competent inspection is essential. For large loads wire slings are used.

 

But am I an expert................

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