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the village idiot

Alpine tractor talk

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I am a big fan of these little fellas. I know that some of you have them and use them for both arb and forestry. I am thinking of upgrading my little Carraro Bitrac in the future. It would be great to get your thoughts and experiences of them.

To start things off, below is a picture of my current steed. It is 27hp, reversible driving position, non articulated. It has a sigma loader which fits on in place of the three point linkage making it a very versatile machine, if a little under powered for some of my needs. It now has proper agri pattern tyres on which improves the grip no end.IMAG0016.jpg.de34191b9f36b5180117e232ae52980f.jpg

 

IMAG0015.jpg.c6ab62176d72cf184753e206472bcc0c.jpg

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Only used ours for running the chop saw/conveyor but the Boss has just purchased a mulcher head for it...great little workhorse....it also has an Igland winch.

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Only used ours for running the chop saw/conveyor but the Boss has just purchased a mulcher head for it...great little workhorse....it also has an Igland winch.

 

Is there any machine you haven't got access to Silky?

 

Which model is that, and what is the metal work for underneath?

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Have a little Holder A15 used with a mulcher for forest paths and powers the palax log processor. Will also pull stems up hillsides where I cannot get in with the MB Trac and forwarder. Looking for a Holder A55 or A60 at the moment but there a bit like hens teeth to find.

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I'm unfamiliar with these, except in pictures.

What is the advantage over another more conventional compact tractor of the same power? Ie kubota/John Deere

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Hi Mick, its all about balance and size.

The design of the alpine (engine sticking out over the front) means that with an attachment on the back they have a much better weight distribution than a conventional compact tractor.

Due to that and their much lower center of gravity, you'll take these places you'd never dream of with a conventional tractor.

I've has alpines sideways across 35 degree slopes and up and down 40+ degree slopes. You cant even walk on that normally!

 

Also, they tend to be more compact and lighter than an equivalent conventional tractor. Park a 80HP alpine next to a farm tractor and it'll be half the weight and 2/3 the size.

They therefore lend themselves to tight access and sensitive sites.

 

Downsides are cost I suppose, and also sometimes a lack of ground clearance in woodland.

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