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Steve Bullman

felling cuts

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imagine as the hinge closes it cant becouse as the inch or so cut out the bottom of the face prevents it from doing so causing it to pop off the hinge and jump...this is not somthing i would do on larger trees as the weight could cause it to barbers chair or ash wich is very prone to barbers chair......

 

Well i'll have to give it a go and see, another usefull trick to know.

 

I hear you about the barbar chairing, even small diameter limbs can barber chair badly. I'll still do a narrow face and nip the sides when in the tree so I can pop them off, this is where a very sharp chain and precise quick cutting seems best to me. Plus make sure you don't lanyard in to stem, or if you do isolate yourself from the loop by attaching to your bridge.

 

Old Willow pollards are the worst you can have 20-30ft striaght limbs of only 8-10" diameter.

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To me these are a kinda binary(computer) or at most tri-fold(Goldilocks) examples of mechanics...

 

Iff the backcut has proceeded enough where the tree is 'breathing'/alive/ready to move; then the hinge/ face machine is loaded with force.

 

If something is loaded with force; that force is either push/compression or pull/tension. In the loaded hinge/face scenario; closed is push and open is pull.

 

But, everything is in equal and opposite forces. So, if pushes and pulls are in opposite directions and inline; they remove each other's power/negate it/neutralize each other. But, if these opposing forces are not inline; we can have more power. If the non-inline opposing forces are do not resist bend; they add to each other (rope on pulley); but if the opposing non-inline forces are on something that resists bending they multiply each other(tourque).

 

A full face kerf/close can give hop in small stuff; but can cause barberchair in larger and brittler. But, If 1 side of face closes and the other is open; we offer 1 side as relief; so less chance of hop or barberchair; the force has another path of relief to go. But also; Instead of both sides of hinge pulling to steer(open) or both sides of hinge/face pushing to steer(closed) generically; with 1 side open/1 side closed we have 1 side pushing up; as the other side is pulling down. More of a non-inline opposite direction of force through a device that resists bending scenario(tourqued use of the forces).

 

Also, when we pull from both sides of hinge at once (generic both sides open) part of each force cancels the other. Not so in the specialized/non-generic example. Also, when we make 1 side closed; 1 side open; we must make the lean side closed. For, that is what gives the harder compression push to center; and the harder pull to center (in concert) on the opposing side. Much, much less force; if the control/non-lean side closes first. For these are responding forces; to the initiating force of the length/angle of the CG.

 

There is another compression point, as pivot; in the hinge. But, this can be differentiated by it has more force. but, then also as the face close on lean side becomes the more loaded position; it becomes the pivot itself. And, nothing is more powerful; than a pivotal change; for it takes the given distance/angles of load and control on either side of the pivot; and gives more to the control side; as it takes it from the load side (or vice versa); thus giving a compound change to the all important ratios.

 

But, this close 1 side first stuff can be dangerous, especially in felling sizes, leverages and stiffnesses. So, i most like it in climbing. A near vertical limb can kinda work; but a horizontal limb to be swept horizontally (making lean side of equation downward); has more leveraged load. For, in these things we set the whole formula on it's ear; the more force against us (weight/length/angle); the more powerfully it works (up until the forces violate the constitution of the spar).

 

Sometimes, i've been able to get a tree or limb to go to the right around an obstacle; hit the close in face on right, then go to the left. But, not always. The close in face on one side is like hitting an obstacle on that side; and tree pushes across to the other side. Only, that obstacle is in the face.

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i like mine in climbing mostly; and speak in felling terms of where they are most understood; and where i saw them first in Dent's bible. i spent many daze and hours troubling over his drawings and explanations to figure out what he was doing. then took the whole model up in the air and tested it out on sweeping horizontal limbs sidewards out from over an obstacle.

 

Upstairs the loads are smaller, and more likely to fall clear of ya. The theories work by maximizing the forces set against ya; so at full leveraged/horizontal are maximized.

 

Though i've controlled it on the ground; i don't outrightly recommend it except in visuals of how to usher such forces in the air; partially because of that page you quote. But, i have had fun with it; and consider it a Nautral adjunct to the Tapered Hinge; in that as the Tapered of 1 side maximizes the tension forces, so the dutch of one side maximizes the push forces; and together they maximize the tourque forces by operating in opposing directions on the hinge lever.

 

MyTreeLessons.Com/images/Dutch Climber.JPG

MyTreeLessons.Com/photogallery/hinge with Dutch Step and tapered hinge.jpg

MyTreeLessons.Com/photogallery/hinge with dutch step and tapered hinge extended .jpg

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any you amagine the stress of doing one with a shed/green house behind!!!!!

can someone please put pictures/vids of the dog tooth, not too sure what youlot call a dogtooth cut....

 

Here ya go dude - lime i felled today. Used the dog-tooth cut as we had a winch on it. Popped over just loverly he did.

5976532a6e042_dogtoothcut-small.jpg.a53e79c62be8ae4e2897604f38a40d76.jpg

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Here ya go dude - lime i felled today. Used the dog-tooth cut as we had a winch on it. Popped over just loverly he did.

 

Hi Mister T,

 

I personally like to use the dog's tooth when doing a fell. Its a brilliant cut, and a lot of times I use it without having a leaning tree, like the text book says to do! I just find it a nice tidy cut with loads of control. Easy to create the perfect hinge...

 

In your picture it looks like you used a ruler on that hinge! The only thing I would say about that whole cut, (and its not even that important) but I would have done a little differently would have been the height of the back cut. I would have tried doing it a little lower. I dont mean the dog's tooth bit, the actual boring cut just a bit lower.

 

Any how nice pic!

 

Jack

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Hi Mister T,

 

I personally like to use the dog's tooth when doing a fell. Its a brilliant cut, and a lot of times I use it without having a leaning tree, like the text book says to do! I just find it a nice tidy cut with loads of control. Easy to create the perfect hinge...

 

In your picture it looks like you used a ruler on that hinge! The only thing I would say about that whole cut, (and its not even that important) but I would have done a little differently would have been the height of the back cut. I would have tried doing it a little lower. I dont mean the dog's tooth bit, the actual boring cut just a bit lower.

 

Any how nice pic!

 

Jack

I will disagree with you on the height of the back-cut Jack, because the tree is being winched over.

The extra height provides a ledge upon which the tree can rotate as it is being pulled, helping avoid stump shoot, especially with such a slim hinge.

 

Fantastic felling

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I don't understand the reasoning behind that "dogtooth" cut. Why not, after boring the backcut, just cut straight out the back. simple as can be, works like a charm....unless you have placed wedges, then you have to cut above them.

 

Or, leave a triangle of holding wood, with the apex directly behind the desired felling direction, and the corners just cut out. Then finish with a fast straight backcut. Works about as well as bore cutting. Or cut slower if you're righting a back leaner...this is prolly a better method for that scenario than bore cutting, which results in a fast release when the strap is finally cut.

 

Then, there's the Coos bay cut for heavy head leaners....no face cut at all......wow, never done or seen one done, but want to. Just two deep kerf cuts on either side of the tree, and 90 degrees off the direction of lean...then cut the back.. and fast!

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Here ya go dude - lime i felled today. Used the dog-tooth cut as we had a winch on it. Popped over just loverly he did.

 

Sorry if i'm missing something here mistertee.

 

I bet it went with a pop!

 

Could you explain why you used a dog tooth cut on a tree which had to be winched over?

 

Surely the winch would be straining against the dog tooth and the dog tooth holding against the winch?

 

The dog tooth cut is for holding trees leaning towards the felling direction until you have cut through the centre wood.

 

You winch over trees that lean away from the felling direction.

 

I can't see why you would employ both techniques on the same tree.

 

Nice even hinge and clearly the tree fell where you wanted it to.:thumbup1:

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