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Squaredy

When is a cubic metre not a cubic metre?

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2 hours ago, peds said:

Guys, I bought a cube of firewood the other day but I'm worried it's a bit under. What do you think? 

20190417_204632.jpg

its only 11.75 inch 3 because you pay for the timber that is lost in the saw cut but its not what you ordered 

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Just to let anybody know who is interested, this has now been resolved.  I finally received from Surefire Logs a correct invoice which I have paid.

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2 hours ago, Squaredy said:

Just to let anybody know who is interested, this has now been resolved.  I finally received from Surefire Logs a correct invoice which I have paid.

They have contacted me, are you happy with the logs?

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On 17/04/2019 at 20:47, peds said:

Guys, I bought a cube of firewood the other day but I'm worried it's a bit under. What do you think? 

I sometimes burn pallets and you get one of those under each corner and in the middle so I sometimes get 9 cubes for free. I didn't realise how much a cube cost these days with scrounging arb arisings.

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builders merchants are the same. ton bags of sand or ballest etc are rarely more than 800kg.

 

If you can pull the straps to meet in the middle its not full. you should just be able to bend them over and thats it.

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On 22/04/2019 at 00:12, samtheman365 said:

They have contacted me, are you happy with the logs?

Sorry for the late reply, but yes generally the logs are good.  There is lots of Oak, and if you split a large one of these it is not really dry enough in the middle, but overall I think the claim that average moisture is under 20% is probably correct.

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Been said before, just cos it’s been in a kiln doesn’t make it perfect to burn. Quite often the moisture is sealed into the log by high heat kilns. 

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48 minutes ago, richardwale said:

Been said before, just cos it’s been in a kiln doesn’t make it perfect to burn. Quite often the moisture is sealed into the log by high heat kilns. 

Freshly cut Oak logs take about a week or more at 70 degrees centigrade to really dry, right through to the middle.  Even then any oversize logs could still be a bit wet inside.  In reality as long as the huge majority of the logs are under 20% it will be fine. 

 

After all, a not quite dry Oak log is still mainly quite dry - just the middle portion which may be only a tenth of the log.

 

I agree of course that air drying is best, but you need to have the space to store in well ventilated conditions under cover (in the case of Oak) maybe two or three years worth of logs.

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