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5 minutes ago, Alex O said:

There was no question , it’s a difficult industry to start in and get a good break and if it’s money you want to earn it will just take awhile, but like most things hard work and persistence will eventually pay off.

This is spot on.  It takes time to get to the stage where you are making good money.  Many drop out long before they get there.  Some people stay in the job all their lives and never get there.

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Skilled construction will always generally pay better than arb. Building is constructive, whereas arb is - lets face it - demolition. People pay for something they want and aspire to have, ie. buildings, which are A)-an investment. B)-permentant and C)-regulated by masses of red tape, thus weeding out the real low-ball operators. Tree removals, and really, apart from occasional reductions and remedial work that's mostly what we do, isn't it? are not something people want to pay for. Its a troublesome expense for folks, and so they don't value it, like having the septic tank emptied or the car fixed.

       

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21 minutes ago, Haironyourchest said:

Skilled construction will always generally pay better than arb. Building is constructive, whereas arb is - lets face it - demolition. People pay for something they want and aspire to have, ie. buildings, which are A)-an investment. B)-permentant and C)-regulated by masses of red tape, thus weeding out the real low-ball operators. Tree removals, and really, apart from occasional reductions and remedial work that's mostly what we do, isn't it? are not something people want to pay for. Its a troublesome expense for folks, and so they don't value it, like having the septic tank emptied or the car fixed.

       

This is so true, and now more than ever - colossal amounts of money are being spent on property these days.  With an ordinary house in many areas now costing half a million quid property owners have come to accept paying professional chippies, brickies, builders etc £250 or even more per day.  And let's be honest these trades need skill and some kit, but not as much as Arb work.  Getting off topic a little now but can anyone tell me why half a day's work fitting a woodburner should cost £600 or so plus parts???????????

 

To get back to the original question, you should follow your heart I believe, though you could make a bit of money brickingfor a few years first.  As a freelancer of course if you want serious money.

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38 minutes ago, Haironyourchest said:

. People pay for something they want and aspire to have, ie. buildings, which are A)-an investment. B)-permentant and C)-regulated by masses of red tape, thus weeding out the real low-ball operators. Tree removals, and really, apart from occasional reductions and remedial work that's mostly what we do, isn't it? are not something people want to pay for. Its a troublesome expense for folks, and so they don't value it, like having the septic tank emptied or the car fixed.

by that merit the roofers must be doing okay, if you dont have a roof or a leaky roof, that is something to fix right now, regardless (more or less) of cost, where landscape or gardening can be done in a few years

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1 hour ago, Haironyourchest said:

Skilled construction will always generally pay better than arb. Building is constructive, whereas arb is - lets face it - demolition. People pay for something they want and aspire to have, ie. buildings, which are A)-an investment. B)-permentant and C)-regulated by masses of red tape, thus weeding out the real low-ball operators. Tree removals, and really, apart from occasional reductions and remedial work that's mostly what we do, isn't it? are not something people want to pay for. Its a troublesome expense for folks, and so they don't value it, like having the septic tank emptied or the car fixed.

       

This is bang on. Your totally correct in what you say here. 

Don’t get me wrong I don’t hate bricklaying with a passion. But I find it mind numbing And increasingly boring day by day. 

Id love to just do something different every once and a while. 

As for pay I’m looked after fairly well, even as a apprentice I take a reasonable packet Home on a Friday. 

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49 minutes ago, Squaredy said:

This is so true, and now more than ever - colossal amounts of money are being spent on property these days.  With an ordinary house in many areas now costing half a million quid property owners have come to accept paying professional chippies, brickies, builders etc £250 or even more per day.  And let's be honest these trades need skill and some kit, but not as much as Arb work.  Getting off topic a little now but can anyone tell me why half a day's work fitting a woodburner should cost £600 or so plus parts???????????

 

To get back to the original question, you should follow your heart I believe, though you could make a bit of money brickingfor a few years first.  As a freelancer of course if you want serious money.

Honestly it seems in construction that any qualified tradesman with a good word of mouth recommendation can charge what he likes. 

As for kit I’d have to disagree. All a brickie actually needs is a trowel and a 4 foot level. Everything else just makes the job easier. 

However I have just purchased a second hand Dewalt 18v kit. That comes in very handy on almost a daily basis. And of course when a chippy puts a rafter or a gable ladder in my way my little husky 236 will come out to play. 

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4 hours ago, Chessa said:

 

Follow your dreams. Do not doubt them. You are young and have time and strength on your side. I started out in just about all of my career changes with following a dream and working voluntarily whilst training, whether chasing routes through rock climbing or environmental work; or forestry or horticultural dreams. Never give in. There are always routes in, around and through. Can you start by getting trained in rope access work through your current trade before you (forgive me) branch out to your big dream? I’m sure you’ll get even better advice than that, here on arbtalk. Don’t give up. Listen to your heart.

The company I work for won’t put me thru any training that isn’t essential. I’ve got my CSCS card and I’m working towards my NVQ level 2. My boss does help me out a lot driving’s lessons and we’ve spoken about a forklift ticket to help around site but as far as getting a rope access ticket, he’d just ask why a bricky needs rope access? We have scaffolders for that. But I do appreciate your point. 

I’d love to do some voluntary weekend work. But like I’ve said everyone seems to caught up in red tape to employ a young person. 

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49 minutes ago, IRE David H said:

by that merit the roofers must be doing okay, if you dont have a roof or a leaky roof, that is something to fix right now, regardless (more or less) of cost, where landscape or gardening can be done in a few years

Considering roofers need no qualifications and almost anyone can do it, I don’t see why they’re on a tradesman rate of £140 a day. 

Why do I have to go thru a apprentiship to earn that when a roofer can turn up, do the job and get paid? 

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I'd stick to brick laying until you know the job inside out, apart from when recession strikes you will always have work, even then a good brickie will come off site work and drop on domestic work. It's cheaper to make a house bigger than buying a bigger property.

 

You could always, (if you can get a start) fill in rainy days with some tree work. Most small companies don't need someone five days a week. Having more than one string to your bow pretty much guarantees you will not be short of work.

 

Just my take on the situation.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Fredwardclarke said:

Considering roofers need no qualifications and almost anyone can do it, I don’t see why they’re on a tradesman rate of £140 a day. 

Why do I have to go thru a apprentiship to earn that when a roofer can turn up, do the job and get paid? 

Can I ask how many bricks you are getting down a day on good straight runs?

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