Jump to content

Fredwardclarke

Member
  • Content count

    21
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Fredwardclarke

  • Rank
    Junior Member

Personal Information

  • Location:
    Burton on Trent
  • Interests
    Gardening, allotmenting, shed building and crossfit
  • Occupation
    Junior landscape gardener
  • City
    Burton on trent

Recent Profile Visitors

66 profile views
  1. A change of industry.

    Thanks kinda what I’m trying to do at the moment. I just want to fill my weekends with tree work and landscaping. My company won’t let me work weekends due to the other brickies and labours not being willing to get out of bed on Saturdays. I don’t see why I’ve been finding it difficult to find weekend work, I come with my own transport, most PPE and a groundsaw. Oh and I’ve got a chipsite.
  2. A change of industry.

    Between 250 and 500 depending on circumstances. But I don’t focus on speed I’d rather lay 250 well than 500 quickly.
  3. A change of industry.

    Considering roofers need no qualifications and almost anyone can do it, I don’t see why they’re on a tradesman rate of £140 a day. Why do I have to go thru a apprentiship to earn that when a roofer can turn up, do the job and get paid?
  4. A change of industry.

    The company I work for won’t put me thru any training that isn’t essential. I’ve got my CSCS card and I’m working towards my NVQ level 2. My boss does help me out a lot driving’s lessons and we’ve spoken about a forklift ticket to help around site but as far as getting a rope access ticket, he’d just ask why a bricky needs rope access? We have scaffolders for that. But I do appreciate your point. I’d love to do some voluntary weekend work. But like I’ve said everyone seems to caught up in red tape to employ a young person.
  5. A change of industry.

    Honestly it seems in construction that any qualified tradesman with a good word of mouth recommendation can charge what he likes. As for kit I’d have to disagree. All a brickie actually needs is a trowel and a 4 foot level. Everything else just makes the job easier. However I have just purchased a second hand Dewalt 18v kit. That comes in very handy on almost a daily basis. And of course when a chippy puts a rafter or a gable ladder in my way my little husky 236 will come out to play.
  6. A change of industry.

    This is bang on. Your totally correct in what you say here. Don’t get me wrong I don’t hate bricklaying with a passion. But I find it mind numbing And increasingly boring day by day. Id love to just do something different every once and a while. As for pay I’m looked after fairly well, even as a apprentice I take a reasonable packet Home on a Friday.
  7. A change of industry.

    Hi guys, my names Ed and I’m fairly new to he forums. I left school last year and started my search for a career. I had been working whilst at school as a landscape gardener and I thoroughly enjoyed the days I spent outside even when it was raining and I was soaking wet I was glad I wasn’t in a classroom so I knew I wanted to work outside. I always enjoyed the arb aspects of my summer job, trimming a few hedges and dragging brash around so I began a search for a apprenticeship in Tree Surgery, I wrote to 11 different local company’s and applied at dart training to see if they could find me an employer, no luck. Out of The 6 companies that replied to me 1 was willing to take me on as a labourer but was not willing to offer put me thru any training. The other 5 either didn’t have any vacancies or expressed concerns over the paperwork regarding taking on a apprentice. I also offered to work voluntarily on the off day for a few company’s purely to gain experience, however again these companies had concerns regarding paperwork and employing young people. So I ended up taking a offer of an appentiship in bricklaying and it’s going well. I’m 6 months in and have passed every practical exam with either a distinction or a merit. My employer is thrilled to have me and looks after me pretty well financially. However when I was on the scaffolding today I found my mind drifiting to awful condition of the surrounding trees. There was inward growth everywhere and most of the trees had outgrown there environment. I wanted to be in doing tree work, having fun dragging brash around and learning a trade I’m genuinely interested in, not tied to a trowel on a dodgy scaffold laying brick after brick after brick. I’m just after a few opinions from people who have been in the arb trade for a few years about what I should do. I plan on sticking my appentiship out for the remaining six months and then evaluating me situation. However id like to be gaining experience now around my existing job.
  8. Anyone use Dewalt Electric Saw ?

    Wish the blue hats would let me have one.
  9. Anyone use Dewalt Electric Saw ?

    You're allowed a chainsaw on site?
  10. Scythe

    Now this is something I'm interested in. I'd be very interested in seeing a comparison of the effects on the operator between the brushcutter and the scythe. Would the adverse effects of the brushcutter outweigh the fatigue of using the scythe. On another note, can anyone see scythes being brought back into mainstream use?
  11. Woodchip sites burton/derby Area?

    Hi, I know this is a old post but if there is anyone still wanting a chip site in the Burton/Stapenhill area I can accept several loads on a allotment site.
  12. Security measures thread

    Your right, you can never be sure of a saws past. Even "new"saws can be stolen from stock.
  13. Dead pine tree

    Looks like a good day's work! A cracking view, I'd certainly have taken more than a moment to enjoy it.
  14. Lumber Supports etc???

    As a avid crossfiter I've learnt the importance of a decent warm up before a workout. If you think about it there's a lot of similarities between manual labour and a work out. What I'm saying is you could try warming up before starting a session on the processor/splitter. Supports seem to help a lot of lads in the gym, I'm sure they would help at work, the problem is would they get in the way? Would they slip out of place? Even if they don't do any actual supporting they will keep your joint and muscle warm.

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×