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What is the most salable sizes of timber

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I've got 10 oak trees and 20 softwood trees to fell near Billinghurst and would like to have the trees milled. I would like to know what sizes of cut timber sell best and where I would sell the timber one it has been milled. Any help appreciated, Robert.

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I've got 10 oak trees and 20 softwood trees to fell near Billinghurst and would like to have the trees milled. I would like to know what sizes of cut timber sell best and where I would sell the timber one it has been milled. Any help appreciated, Robert.

 

Hi Robert,

 

Sorry no one replied, must have slipped me by as well.

 

I cut in the 1 to 2.5" range usually, with the odd bits thicker. Regarding markets to sell in, try contacting local furniture makers in your area, though you'll really need a kiln. See my DIY kiln thread on how to build one cheaply.

 

Jonathan

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I always cut a bit of 3" and 4" for legs and frames.

 

There is some demand for oak for exterior and structural use - prices are lower but the section is usually heavier so less milling, and they may take it green.

 

Alec

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Cheers for the information. I was thinking of cutting most at 3" or 4" as this can be remilled to lots of useful sizes. Is it possible to keep some of the oak as 24" x 24" x 8'? Can it be seasoned outdoors like this.

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problem with keepin it oversize, especially oak(and now its getting warmer)is it will distorte a fair bit and you will find it hard to get a square side to lay flat to remill!

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Cheers for the information. I was thinking of cutting most at 3" or 4" as this can be remilled to lots of useful sizes. Is it possible to keep some of the oak as 24" x 24" x 8'? Can it be seasoned outdoors like this.

 

3" and 4" are handy to have in small quantities, but not the usual thickness for most things in their own right. 24" x 24" is a big section to keep at only 8' long - do you have any particular plans for it? It would take about 20yrs to air dry through.

 

As has been said, I would mill to finished size. You can re-saw, but you have more risk of warping and surface checking in the larger section which can seriously reduce yield.

 

Alec

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I would suggest milling to the size of the finished thickness. Resawing can throw up problems in tension release in the timber. From boards that were dried flat when resawn they can end up rather far from flat both across the length and width. Also your drying time is reduced if you mill thinner thus a quicker cash return.

 

The most common thicknesses I would buy both for my own use and resale in the UK are 1" & 2". These cover most uses in furniture making although as stated above some 3" & 4" is good to have in stock.

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1.25", 1.5", 2.25", 2.5" seem to be popular - I wouldn't have too much thick stuff - as said distorts, tears and very tricky to re saw.

 

 

No thicker than 4" IMO.

 

 

:001_smile:

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