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stewmo

SRT access question

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Hi folks

I’ve been using a knee ascender / foot ascender combo to access trees for a while now.

I’m realising my technique is hurting my wrists. I must be using my arms too much so I’m looking at how to improve.

 

My thoughts are

 

1, use a hand ascender like Kong Futura purely to give my hands something bigger to grip than the rope

 

2, use some sort of pulley on the chest harness to hold the rope and hold my body more upright so I’m not having to hold myself upright.

 

Any thoughts??

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Both could work.

 

Maybe just try and keep your body more upright using your core.  Use the legs more and less on the arms.  Keep your legs under your butt and imagine you are pedalling a bike backwards.  

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Hand ascender might help but you shouldn't have to grip the rope tight. Just keep yourself upright as rich says

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Just stand on your feet more upright like rich says , what are you using to advance the hitch ?
Hand ascenders can work but you should be aiming to let your legs do the work..kinda the point in it really...

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Sounds daft but I always try not to wrap my thumb around the rope when ascending, means you don’t grip the rope so tight and therefore less on your arms. The whole back peddling a bike thing is spot on too👌

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Thanks, like the bicycle analogy.

I’m using a zigzag chicane setup. I’ve used a neck tether, lanyard over shoulder and the 4srt chester at various points to advance hitch. Not sure what is best at the moment.

I can get in a good rhythm with ascent and feel I am pretty upright to be honest, but obviously not enough so just trying to perfect it and save my wrists.

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could it be another part of your climbing thats hurting your wrists, how are you climbing the rest of the tree?

i find srt can be hard on my elbows, i put it down to asscending  by reaching up and holding myself on the rope and using the foot accsender ( sit stand method without the sit if that makes sense!)

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could it be another part of your climbing thats hurting your wrists, how are you climbing the rest of the tree?
i find srt can be hard on my elbows, i put it down to asscending  by reaching up and holding myself on the rope and using the foot accsender ( sit stand method without the sit if that makes sense!)


Thanks. Yeah I imagine it’s the general toll to an extent. I swop all the time between srt and drt depending on what I’m faced with.

I just noticed recently having had a spell without srt access that my wrists were feeling a bit better and then did a day with a few ascents and left wrist was left really aching. So that’s why I’m now questioning my technique. Who knows, maybe I’m just getting too old (44)…..

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