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Animal-Freeride

Woodworm infestation in firewood

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Hi all, I've just joined the forum having made a schoolboy error and being let down by a specialist firm who failed to turn up! They say you learn from mistakes and think I made a big one about 3 months ago when I decided to empty our woodstore into our garage whilst building works were being undertaken outside.

 

A few weeks ago we started noticing small beetles around the window area which became a infestation. I kind of dismissed it at first but the wife wasn't happy so investigated further. To my horror I discovered the logs were absolutely riddled with holes along with tell tale signs of woodworm frass. I immediately moved the logs outside but am obviously concerned they may have laid eggs in other timbers (i.e. joists etc). That said our house is quite modern (built in the 90's) so not sure if there is risk.

 

Since moving the firewood the number of beetles in the garage have reduced to a point two days ago there are none.

 

I have taken a few close up pictures and would appreciate if anyone could advise what they are and provide any appropriate advice. I'm fairly sure they are not deathwatch beetles as have not heard them make any distinctive sounds at all.

 

Apologies for a lengthy post but we have been a bit anxious about the situation and hope someone can help.

 

Thanks in anticipation.

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They look like ash bark beetles, very common in ash bark. If you remove some of the bark of a log you should see galleries under the bark but not going into the wood. I wouldn't worry about them.

Edited by Paul in the woods
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14 minutes ago, Paul in the woods said:

They look like ash bark beetles, very common in ash bark. If you remove some of the bark of a log you should see galleries under the bark but not going into the wood. I wouldn't worry about them.

Hi Paul, thanks for your prompt response. It is really appreciated and has helped put our mind at ease. As you would expect I did search the net and drew the same conclusion as yourself although don't profess to be an expert hence why I placed a post on this forum. I'll further check the bark tomorrow as suggested 🙂 👍

Edited by Animal-Freeride
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28 minutes ago, Retired Climber said:

The colouring in the second shot looks like Deathwatch beetle. 

I was concerned the could be at first but as stated, no distinctive sounds heard. Also my neighbour has stated the wood is ash which seems to confirm Ash Bark Beetles.

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54 minutes ago, Animal-Freeride said:

I was concerned the could be at first but as stated, no distinctive sounds heard. Also my neighbour has stated the wood is ash which seems to confirm Ash Bark Beetles.

Not that I've seen, or heard, deathwatch beetle and they do look a bit similar from googling but seem to prefer very old oak that has also been degraded by a specific fungus. Is the building oak framed?

 

Whenever I have had ash logs they have inevitably been bored to some extent in my store.

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I suggest you need to split quite a few pieces of firewood and see if the holes go into the wood.  If it is only the bark that is damaged then I would say you can stop worrying.

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1 hour ago, Squaredy said:

I suggest you need to split quite a few pieces of firewood and see if the holes go into the wood.  If it is only the bark that is damaged then I would say you can stop worrying.

Squaredy, I kind of done this hacking the bark away and appear to be boring holes sideways. I'm no entomologist but I've looked on Google (images shown below) and am fairly sure they're Ash Bark Beetles given the wood is ash, the channels created and the distinctive antenna, which is coned shaped, compared to Deathwatch Beetles (as per third image). 

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download.jpeg

Edited by Animal-Freeride

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The more you read on the deathwatch page the less likely it is to be them

EN.M.WIKIPEDIA.ORG


Usually oak and must have been dead at least 60 years, 10 years from laying eggs to pupating, damp wood, etc.

Simplest explanation is usually the best, ash bark borer, is pretty common on ash I've had too. No chance of that damaging the house.

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