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re - nesting birds

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You would of thought the lady and gent climbing your trees would of had a bit of thought for your trees with them being wildlife enthusiast but Obviously not in my opinion amateur with no respect for anything or anyone. Me me’s that’s all they are they have made me mad 😡 and there not my trees 🌲 but if it was the other way round they would be screaming 😱 blue murder. If I have got the saying correct. 😂 👍 

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7 hours ago, Slad said:

3. ...and what is the Industry recommendation? (Because the rules and what people actually do are sometimes different 😉)

Not an expert at all but a bit of a search shows the Arb Association's ‘Industry Code of Practice for Arboriculture: Tree Work at Height’ (ICoP) would be worth quoting.

 

Found here: https://www.trees.org.uk/News-Blog/Latest-News/Updated-Industry-Code-of-Practice-for-Arboricultur

 

"The use of spikes is invasive and can significantly damage the tree. For this reason, their use should be considered carefully and they should be employed only where tree health is of negligible consequence, e.g. when the tree or tree section being climbed is being removed, or during aerial rescue where the safety of a casualty takes priority."

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While spiking a tree that is not being removed is not best practice. It's not really an issue to one tree in a wood. Arguably the wounds will promote decay and good deadwood habitats. Using a throw line could disturb the nest and your not going to carry a ladder through the woods and even if you were would it be long enough?

 

Obviously permission from the landowner should have been sought...

 

 

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26 minutes ago, benedmonds said:

While spiking a tree that is not being removed is not best practice. It's not really an issue to one tree in a wood. Arguably the wounds will promote decay and good deadwood habitats. Using a throw line could disturb the nest and your not going to carry a ladder through the woods and even if you were would it be long enough?

 

Obviously permission from the landowner should have been sought...

 

 

Could they have thrown a line into a lower branch and then ascended the tree a branch at a time? Like a tree surgeon/arborist would of been taught or put a line in a separate tree and swung into the other tree? Not sure it’s still right to spur the tree even tho it’s in a wood what if it had been a really old 🌲 in my opinion cheers 👍 

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11 hours ago, benedmonds said:

While spiking a tree that is not being removed is not best practice. It's not really an issue to one tree in a wood. Arguably the wounds will promote decay and good deadwood habitats. Using a throw line could disturb the nest and your not going to carry a ladder through the woods and even if you were would it be long enough?

 

Obviously permission from the landowner should have been sought...

 

That's not ideal if the birds return to the same tree year after year.

 

I would have thought the answer was simple, if you can't inspect the nest without disturbance or damage to the tree then don't inspect them.

 

I have often wondered if ringing is always necessary or if it's done more for the benefit of the person/group doing it.

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3 minutes ago, Paul in the woods said:

That's not ideal if the birds return to the same tree year after year.

 

I would have thought the answer was simple, if you can't inspect the nest without disturbance or damage to the tree then don't inspect them.

 

I have often wondered if ringing is always necessary or if it's done more for the benefit of the person/group doing it.

Totally agree With that mate that was exactly my thoughts to. Could they just use a drone to monitor them?

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1 hour ago, Paul in the woods said:

That's not ideal if the birds return to the same tree year after year.

 

I would have thought the answer was simple, if you can't inspect the nest without disturbance or damage to the tree then don't inspect them.

 

I have often wondered if ringing is always necessary or if it's done more for the benefit of the person/group doing it.

I feel the same.  There is online discussion on the benefits of ringing.  Given that everyone has a camera of some sort these days, why they can't they do it using pics and pattern matching?  They can do facial recognition on people wearing masks and identify whales by their fin shape and patterns.  Why not birds?  Especially if you use a cheap £30 drone.  One quick session and the birds are just scratching their heads wondering what it was, rather than scared (and planning to move house, in this case).

 

 I have an 8m ladder I used to fix the trail cam and it was a bitch to carry.  But I carried it and a 4m foldable and could have reached the lower branches easily - that's what I bought the 8m one for in the first place.  

 

Thanks for all the comments on spikes; I'll forward that on to the people who are in charge of the ringers.  They will always see the birds as being the priority and they need to know there's more to it than that.  I think they ring the way they do out of habit and it's time they had a re-think on whether it's necessary and if it is, how do do it without impacting on other species of living things (including the landowner! :D ).  

 

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, benedmonds said:

While spiking a tree that is not being removed is not best practice. It's not really an issue to one tree in a wood. Arguably the wounds will promote decay and good deadwood habitats. Using a throw line could disturb the nest and your not going to carry a ladder through the woods and even if you were would it be long enough?

 

Obviously permission from the landowner should have been sought...

 

 

I see your point, but that's my timber/firewood we're talking about here. It has value to me, and also to the birds, which prefer living trees to nest in.  A throw line might disturb the birds, but probably less than being picked up, lowered to the ground, weighed, measured, ringed and raised back up into the nest.  I think how the climber gets to the nest is going to be insignificant compared to what comes next.  You'll have seen my comments  about ladders; it's not easy.  But if you care enough about wildlife to ring it, you should care enough to do the job right.

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18 minutes ago, Slad said:

I see your point, but that's my timber/firewood we're talking about here. It has value to me, and also to the birds, which prefer living trees to nest in.  A throw line might disturb the birds, but probably less than being picked up, lowered to the ground, weighed, measured, ringed and raised back up into the nest.  I think how the climber gets to the nest is going to be insignificant compared to what comes next.  You'll have seen my comments  about ladders; it's not easy.  But if you care enough about wildlife to ring it, you should care enough to do the job right.

If you know who they are, and if I were in your shoes, I’d let myself into his & her house, sit down to watch the TV and hoist my feet up (shoes on) on the coffee table. 
 

They’d have absolutely no scope to complain because that is pretty much (metaphorically) the disrespect, self entitlement and invasion of privacy they have visited upon you. 
 

PS - please video and share if you choose to adopt my methodology 😂😂

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