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Steve2011

Thinking of investing in ibcs

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Hi guys 

I am looking at ibc's and a rotator, I have been using vented sacks for the last 5 years, and finding that even the moscato net sacks are restricting the air flow. 

I have found out that ibc cages are cheap for what they are compared to spud boxes. Would love to know the pros and cons of them. They will be stored in my barn so rain on the sides wouldn't be a problem.

how many logs fall out the gaps is it worth the time to cable tie mesh round the sides?

how long is the lifespan?

do logs go mouldy/discoloured?

Will a pump truck will fit under the metal plastic pallets?

any advice would be appreciated.

cheers

 

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Hi Steve. Been using them for many years. Airflow is great and not killed any yet but the bases wooden or metal have need some repair work or new pallets in the case of some of the wooden ones. I started wrapping mine with chicken wire but now just cable tie the two cross poles that hold the tank in vertically into the bigger gap you get on the ends of the crates. Not many logs  fall out but a few need picking up from time to time. Not much mould on our logs unless the crates are out uncovered for a time but not had any complaints either way as long as the logs are dry. Pump truck works fine on all the ones we have.

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Hi there been using ibcs for about 12 months now and really sing they’re praises. I stack mine 2 high outside and cut the tanks corner to corner to make the hats to cover the top of the second crate. I currently have about 50 outside full. Also to add I processed some green ish chestnut about 6 weeks ago straight into the crates and stacked up as above, tested it yesterday as it was looking quite dry and was reading 20 percent. More summers like this the better. 

On the rotator side of things I’m looking to invest in one but they are rather expensive, 4300 for a new one from agriweld I was quoted this week. 

Rob 

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On 02/11/2018 at 07:46, Woodworks said:

Hi Steve. Been using them for many years. Airflow is great and not killed any yet but the bases wooden or metal have need some repair work or new pallets in the case of some of the wooden ones. I started wrapping mine with chicken wire but now just cable tie the two cross poles that hold the tank in vertically into the bigger gap you get on the ends of the crates. Not many logs  fall out but a few need picking up from time to time. Not much mould on our logs unless the crates are out uncovered for a time but not had any complaints either way as long as the logs are dry. Pump truck works fine on all the ones we have.

Thanks woodworks, I am going to get some for next season as I think the air flow in them couldn't be any better than anything else, also should be able to keep more logs in stock. Also do they hold about 1.25 meters?

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13 hours ago, Rwhiteheadfirewood said:

Hi there been using ibcs for about 12 months now and really sing they’re praises. I stack mine 2 high outside and cut the tanks corner to corner to make the hats to cover the top of the second crate. I currently have about 50 outside full. Also to add I processed some green ish chestnut about 6 weeks ago straight into the crates and stacked up as above, tested it yesterday as it was looking quite dry and was reading 20 percent. More summers like this the better. 

On the rotator side of things I’m looking to invest in one but they are rather expensive, 4300 for a new one from agriweld I was quoted this week. 

Rob 

Hi Rob 

thanks for your feedback, I should be able to stack 4 high in the middle of the barn other wise it will be 3. When the ready to burn comes in least it will be a bit more achievable! As rotator I have seen secondhand ones around £1000 +vat I need a class 2 one as I will put it on my 2.5 forks. But unfortunately like every thing with logs it is an outlay, if it makes the job easier then it is an investment.

cheers Steve 

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13 hours ago, Rwhiteheadfirewood said:

Hi there been using ibcs for about 12 months now and really sing they’re praises. I stack mine 2 high outside and cut the tanks corner to corner to make the hats to cover the top of the second crate. I currently have about 50 outside full. Also to add I processed some green ish chestnut about 6 weeks ago straight into the crates and stacked up as above, tested it yesterday as it was looking quite dry and was reading 20 percent. More summers like this the better. 

On the rotator side of things I’m looking to invest in one but they are rather expensive, 4300 for a new one from agriweld I was quoted this week. 

Rob 

With just cutting hats how do you keep the rain from soaking the sides of the IBC's.

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3 minutes ago, arboriculturist said:

With just cutting hats how do you keep the rain from soaking the sides of the IBC's.

I have a barn too , so the outside ones are getting processed ready for next winter so they will go in the barn once the 100 cube or so empty’s out of the shed, luckily I can access both ends of my shed so I can start one end whilst still putting more in the other end. Rob 

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4 minutes ago, Rwhiteheadfirewood said:

I have a barn too , so the outside ones are getting processed ready for next winter so they will go in the barn once the 100 cube or so empty’s out of the shed, luckily I can access both ends of my shed so I can start one end whilst still putting more in the other end. Rob 

That's a fortunate scenario and an advantage of having plenty of level space, whereas I have plenty of sloping space which doesn't fit with stacking up IBC's. 

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17 minutes ago, arboriculturist said:

With just cutting hats how do you keep the rain from soaking the sides of the IBC's.

Absolutely not an issue, any rain blown onto the exposed sides will as easily be dried by the wind on rainless days, in my experience in our wetter Co. Antrim climate.

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Seconded.  The logs most exposed to the rain are most exposed to the wind:  swings n roundabouts.

I often don't bother covering the cages at all for the first few months of seasoning in the name of maximising airflow.  You'd be surprised how few logs actually get wet, even after a downpour.  It's like heavy rain falling on very dry ground; it doesn't filter evenly through all the soil, it pours down a small number of channels.  Same with the logs.

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