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Steve2011

Thinking of investing in ibcs

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1 hour ago, nepia said:

Seconded.  The logs most exposed to the rain are most exposed to the wind:  swings n roundabouts.

I often don't bother covering the cages at all for the first few months of seasoning in the name of maximising airflow.  You'd be surprised how few logs actually get wet, even after a downpour.  It's like heavy rain falling on very dry ground; it doesn't filter evenly through all the soil, it pours down a small number of channels.  Same with the logs.

I tried that but never again. Had some crates out for a few months late winter with no hats but living on Dartmoor it proved a bad plan as they sat wet for long periods. When they did get covered the logs dried fine and no rot as such but they looked bloody awful.

 

Steve a bit under 1.2 m3 if I remember right. If you are stacking them you can mound them up so when they have dried and settled probably around 1.1 m3. I handball off the top logs to get each crate down to a cube picking out the short ones for the few customers that want dinky logs

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They're loads better than bags for seasoning and handling. I can stack them 3 high to save space, higher if you had a telehandler. I wouldn't bother putting mesh round them, I don't tend to find too many logs fall out. Only thing that's a bit more difficult is unloading them by hand but if you're going to get a rotator that's not an issue for you.

 

When I run out of inside space I do as Woodworks posted on here years ago and cut the tank inners in half to make roofs, drill a few holes near to the bottom edge and tie them to the IBC with baler twine. It's really only the ends of the logs that get wet in driving rain so they soon dry out even in winter. The main thing is stopping the rain getting in to the middle of the crate.

Edited by Ashes_Firewood

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On 05/11/2018 at 11:09, Ashes_Firewood said:

They're loads better than bags for seasoning and handling. I can stack them 3 high to save space, higher if you had a telehandler. I wouldn't bother putting mesh round them, I don't tend to find too many logs fall out. Only thing that's a bit more difficult is unloading them by hand but if you're going to get a rotator that's not an issue for you.

 

When I run out of inside space I do as Woodworks posted on here years ago and cut the tank inners in half to make roofs, drill a few holes near to the bottom edge and tie them to the IBC with baler twine. It's really only the ends of the logs that get wet in driving rain so they soon dry out even in winter. The main thing is stopping the rain getting in to the middle of the crate.

Ash - you say you stack on 3 high, but I cannot recall if you have them on level concrete surface. We stack them 4 high on hardcore and I was wondering if anyone stacks 5 high on flat concrete?

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Ash - you say you stack on 3 high, but I cannot recall if you have them on level concrete surface. We stack them 4 high on hardcore and I was wondering if anyone stacks 5 high on flat concrete?


Unless all the bases and tops were in absolute a1 condition so they fit together perfectly and unless they were stored inside out of the wind I wouldn’t risk it. They’re quite unstable 4 high at times.

I do a row of 4 high with a row of 3 High either side outside on hardcore and that’s been ok.

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If anyone is worried about stacking then potato boxes are a good option. We stack up to 5 high but I've seen them double that. 

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10 hours ago, SbTVF said:

 


Unless all the bases and tops were in absolute a1 condition so they fit together perfectly and unless they were stored inside out of the wind I wouldn’t risk it. They’re quite unstable 4 high at times.

I do a row of 4 high with a row of 3 High either side outside on hardcore and that’s been ok.

 

Had some empty and some full 4 high on hardcore for about 2 months in the storms as well. Holding up well. Planned to stack 5 high on level concrete within a building and just wondered how others faired?

Edited by arboriculturist

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On 11/11/2018 at 09:25, arboriculturist said:

Ash - you say you stack on 3 high, but I cannot recall if you have them on level concrete surface. We stack them 4 high on hardcore and I was wondering if anyone stacks 5 high on flat concrete?

I only go 3 when they're stacked inside an open fronted shed that's got a good concrete floor. Can't go higher as that's as high as the tractor can reach.

 

Can't see why you couldn't go 5 high with a telehandler on a good surface inside. Hardest part at that height would be seeing that you've got the base lined up properly with the IBC below that it's going to sit on

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I think 5 high with a telehandler would be murder trying to line up at that distance. With our forklift with side shift we lift 2 together so you only have to see top of crate 3 when stacking 5 high - needs a bit of practice though. It's all about maximising floor space.

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