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Tree hugger lover

What qualifications are required to be a tree surveyor

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Hi everyone,

 

I'm new on here so sorry if I am not posting correctly (someone let me know if now).

 

So I hope to become a tree surveyor or some sort, basically have the role of doing lots of site visits (don't want to be office based) and assessing trees whatever job title that may come under. 

 

I'm doing my level 2 arboriculture now and am going to start my ABC level 4 course in September. I also already have a BSc in Agriculture/ Plant science as well as lots of practical experience as groundie.

 

Is there any other qualifications or training I should do to open doors towards these sort of jobs for me? Am I likely to just have to get any role (e.g. tree officer) after finishing my level 4 just to get experience whilst I study more on the side? Should I be doing a different course? Or could I get a surveying course straight of the back of these qualifications and work my way up?

 

Sorry lots of questions, even if you can only answer one any replies at all would be greatly appreciated! 

 

Thanks in advance :)

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Professional Tree Inspection is worth going for - that opened up doors for me.
Contact local arb consultants and make yourself known to them.

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Level 4 and PTI is fine for general risk surveys which is probably where you should start. L6 covers planning and subsidence in a lot more detail though so long term you may want to look at that.  You will probably need L6 if you want to do CPR reports in the future as well plus the expert witness training obviously. That is all well down the road though. Some  housing associations ask for QTRA as well.  Good luck. Where are you based?  

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Climbing tickets maybe a good thing as to many tree surveys I have read and then done work on the trees the survey has missed lots of things. 

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1 hour ago, woody paul said:

Climbing tickets maybe a good thing as to many tree surveys I have read and then done work on the trees the survey has missed lots of things. 

What sort of things have they missed? 
 

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Just now, Chris at eden said:

What sort of things have they missed? 
 

Massive cavities in top of limbs and splits.. 

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2 minutes ago, woody paul said:

Massive cavities in top of limbs and splits.. 

There are some really dodgy surveyors about. You should be able to see stuff like that from the ground and then recommend an aerial inspection by a competent tree surgeon.  I’ve looked at trees in the past that have been deemed ok on the last survey and you can see immediately that there is a huge cavity on the rear of the trunk from the swelling. I assume the old surveyor hadn’t looked around the back.  That was working as a junior TO.  I visited one where a developer had cut roots off a mature beech putting in a septic tank. The resident told me the last chap that went viewed from a distance as he didn’t want to get his shoes dirty, he had gone to a building site without boots. Obviously he missed it. 
 

I used to do climbing inspections when I first started surveying in 2005 but I don’t anymore as I am too old and have lost the strength and fitness that I had when on the tools. That happens to most surveyors eventually.  Having CS 38 is ok at the start but it’s not something I would get if I didn’t already have it from being a climber. I carry binoculars and extendable ladders in the van. Anything other than that I recommend a tree surgeon goes up and looks.  

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33 minutes ago, Chris at eden said:

There are some really dodgy surveyors about. You should be able to see stuff like that from the ground and then recommend an aerial inspection by a competent tree surgeon.  I’ve looked at trees in the past that have been deemed ok on the last survey and you can see immediately that there is a huge cavity on the rear of the trunk from the swelling. I assume the old surveyor hadn’t looked around the back.  That was working as a junior TO.  I visited one where a developer had cut roots off a mature beech putting in a septic tank. The resident told me the last chap that went viewed from a distance as he didn’t want to get his shoes dirty, he had gone to a building site without boots. Obviously he missed it. 
 

I used to do climbing inspections when I first started surveying in 2005 but I don’t anymore as I am too old and have lost the strength and fitness that I had when on the tools. That happens to most surveyors eventually.  Having CS 38 is ok at the start but it’s not something I would get if I didn’t already have it from being a climber. I carry binoculars and extendable ladders in the van. Anything other than that I recommend a tree surgeon goes up and looks.  

Should of said one tree that had massive decay in limb could of been seen with small ladder even one of those telescopic ones, and that tree was inspected by a big company which sent parish council a 28 page report on it. 

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Would push the tree climb one bit more , then Bat scoping add to yr PTI , they are not long courses anyway - plus climbing keeps yr fitness up   . K

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