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swinny

Alternator ppr...? Anyone heard of it or know anything about it?

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Hi everyone,

 

Just bought a new auto feed clock for a bandit 90 and come to fit it. When calibrating the clock it needs to know how many teeth on flywheel for the sensor (not my setup!) Or the alternator ppr (my setup :( )

 

anyone know anything about alternator ppr? Is there an easy way to find it out I.e stamped on alternator somewhere etc? 

 

Engine is an air-cooled hatz diesel 73hp

 

Cheers

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9 hours ago, swinny said:

Hi everyone,

 

Just bought a new auto feed clock for a bandit 90 and come to fit it. When calibrating the clock it needs to know how many teeth on flywheel for the sensor (not my setup!) Or the alternator ppr (my setup :( )

 

anyone know anything about alternator ppr? Is there an easy way to find it out I.e stamped on alternator somewhere etc? 

 

Engine is an air-cooled hatz diesel 73hp

 

Cheers

I wonder if ppr= pulse per revolution?

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pulse per revolution of alternator or crankshaft?

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1 minute ago, openspaceman said:

I wonder if ppr= pulse per revolution?

Possibly yes, it has to have something to calculate from.... 

 

Had a Google before and it said something about poles on alternator, diameter of pully 1/4 or something and sounded a chappy thing to find out... and not even sure if it would have been correct either! 

 

Auto feed is useless to me at the moment and disconnected and using control bar to manually do the stress control

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I cannot really help but most  alternators have two poles on the rotor and 3 pairs of stator coils, if the W terminal is on one stator coil I would expect  only  two pulses per rev. I have one on my bench but it's not working yet otherwise I'd see if it gave a pulse when spun by hand.

 

The reason for knowing the diameter of the alternator and crankshaft pulleys is to know how much faster the alternator revs than the engine.

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8 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

I cannot really help but most  alternators have two poles on the rotor and 3 pairs of stator coils, if the W terminal is on one stator coil I would expect  only  two pulses per rev. I have one on my bench but it's not working yet otherwise I'd see if it gave a pulse when spun by hand.

 

The reason for knowing the diameter of the alternator and crankshaft pulleys is to know how much faster the alternator revs than the engine.

Thanks.... I think I best pull the covers and have a quick measure and maybe some pics when the weather gets better!

 

Will report back

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On 31/10/2021 at 21:25, openspaceman said:

I cannot really help but most  alternators have two poles on the rotor and 3 pairs of stator coils, if the W terminal is on one stator coil I would expect  only  two pulses per rev. I have one on my bench but it's not working yet otherwise I'd see if it gave a pulse when spun by hand.

 

The reason for knowing the diameter of the alternator and crankshaft pulleys is to know how much faster the alternator revs than the engine.

Does this help at all? 4 connections on it.... as we look at the pic there is 12v feed at 8pm.... another connection at 10pm.... w post at 12pm  and another little one at about 4pm 

20211124_072403.jpg

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Alternators are three phase, a pulse wire can be tapped off of any one of the three phase wires before they get to the rectifier. So even if there is no pulse wire you can still connect one, its a simple job.

Edit: Forgot to add that these pulses can be counted when the engine is running using the induction gadget on a decent timing light, one that shows rpm.

 

Bob

Edited by aspenarb
because Bobs losing his marbles
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38 minutes ago, aspenarb said:

Alternators are three phase, a pulse wire can be tapped off of any one of the three phase wires before they get to the rectifier. So even if there is no pulse wire you can still connect one, its a simple job.

Edit: Forgot to add that these pulses can be counted when the engine is running using the induction gadget on a decent timing light, one that shows rpm.

 

Bob

Right, the wires already there from the old clock so that's OK, I just need to calibrate it to read correctly the rpm of the engine...

I remember years ago using a timing lightning my college days back in 2006/7 ish, never used one since lol. Can't even remember what's what.... something else I'll have to buy then I suppose 🤔

 

And I always thought they were for dizzy cap timing?

 

Infact the wire feed is that red one on the w post that feeds the clock  to give the rpm

Edited by swinny

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