Jump to content
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
Gav73

Gage tree

Question

Hi all, after a little bit of advice, I planted a gage tree about 3 years ago, it’s grown very quickly and has never been trimmed. This time last year it was covered in blossom, which was quickly picked off by the local bullfinches.

This year every new bud has been pecked off by bullfinches and the blossom is only on a handful of very low twigs.

I’m thinking about taking some of the height out of the tree and I’ve read that this time of year is best to do it.

Any suggestions on how much to take off and anyone have any ideas to prevent further bullfinch damage?

I’m concerned that the bullfinches will move onto the plums, apples and pears planted in the same area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recommended Posts

  • 0
Just now, Gav73 said:

 

Hi all, after a little bit of advice, I planted a gage tree about 3 years ago, it’s grown very quickly and has never been trimmed. This time last year it was covered in blossom, which was quickly picked off by the local bullfinches.

This year every new bud has been pecked off by bullfinches and the blossom is only on a handful of very low twigs.

I’m thinking about taking some of the height out of the tree and I’ve read that this time of year is best to do it.

Any suggestions on how much to take off and anyone have any ideas to prevent further bullfinch damage?

I’m concerned that the bullfinches will move onto the plums, apples and pears planted in the same area.

 

410. Shotgun. K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

With plums of all types it's best to wait until they leaf out. That reduces the risk of silverleaf infection.

 

How big is it at the moment and why do you want to prune it? If it's not too big, the main pruning on plums is to remove dead and crossing branches and keep it open enough that the light gets in to the centre of the tree. There isn't really any need to prune more.

 

Bullfinches can be a problem. There isn't much you can do about it other than netting. They tend to go for plums as they are early flowering. By the time the pears and apples come out, there are other, more interesting things to go for.

 

Alec

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
With plums of all types it's best to wait until they leaf out. That reduces the risk of silverleaf infection.
 
How big is it at the moment and why do you want to prune it? If it's not too big, the main pruning on plums is to remove dead and crossing branches and keep it open enough that the light gets in to the centre of the tree. There isn't really any need to prune more.
 
Bullfinches can be a problem. There isn't much you can do about it other than netting. They tend to go for plums as they are early flowering. By the time the pears and apples come out, there are other, more interesting things to go for.
 
Alec


Thanks, there are loads of branches crossing over and they do need to be cleared because they’re rubbing. The overall height of the gage is approx 15’

Last year I had hardly any fruit on any of the trees, which was the complete opposite of the previous year and the only thing that was different was the gage blossoming for the first time - and the arrival of the bullfinches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
42 minutes ago, Gav73 said:

 


Guessing that’s for the finches and not the tree emoji23.png

 

Yea n dont use it early Spring  as Silver leaf - as mentioned - could also be a problem from pellets cutting foliage  😆 K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

You could apply to natural England for a individual licence to control the bullfinches. 
 

if that fails you could put a net over the tree or hang some cds 💿 by some string in the trees to scare or try some rope bangers. or buy a decoy owl or hawk put it on a post round your trees that might work. 👍 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Net the tree and put some feeders up with crushed sunflower hearts in  away from the tree . Best of both worlds .

Edited by Stubby
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I,d happily sacrifice the blossom and plums to have the Bullfinches in my garden,don,t see em too often here nowadays

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
35 minutes ago, gary112 said:

I,d happily sacrifice the blossom and plums to have the Bullfinches in my garden,don,t see em too often here nowadays

Well, you know what to do. Plant yourself a greengage!

 

Alec

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Just now, agg221 said:

Well, you know what to do. Plant yourself a greengage!

 

Alec

Got one but don,t get Bullfinches unfortunately

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Featured Adverts

  • Tip site reviews

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.