Jump to content
JT19

Battery powered chainsaws

Recommended Posts

Hello 

 

I have a homlite 14" petrol chainsaw I bought years ago. I'm happy with it but was wondering if a battery one would be any good? I only use it for cutting up my own logs for my wood burner and sometimes it's a faff to cut up a wheelbarrow load with the petrol saw as you need petrol oil etc. 

Anyone with experience with them? 

I'm thinking Makita as I've already got power tools by them using the same batteries etc. 

 

Cheers 

Josh 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are ok, however you still need chain oil and at least two batteries fully charged ready to go, a right pain if you run out of battery use half way through.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I understand that. How many logs would you expect to cut from a charge? I know logs very so much but a rough guide 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the 18v makita one but not used it much for firewood as I use a makita lecky corded one or petrol for that.

 

Used the 18v so far for prunning small trees shrubs etc & random odd jobs

 

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcT01Ln47ckIFOX_zAaJt

 

Went for the 18v  over  the 36v makita as only wanted it for small diameter stuff. 

 

Was put off by the heavy weight of the 36v makita version with only a 1.1kw motor compared to a petrol 40cc saw with 2.2kw. 

 

Stihl msa2220 is 2.1kw for similar weight so more like a 40cc saw

 

The mirco 3/8 chain on the 18v makita is very smooth on small diameter cuts and leaves a nice finish - smoother & less grabby than a bigger chain. Also bought some bumper spikes as  It didin't come with them.

 

Happy with it so far & don't see the point of cordless for firewood, unless you have no plug

 

You aren't  really suppose to use the 18v it on the ground though as  its a topper......

Edited by Stere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JT19 said:

Yes I understand that. How many logs would you expect to cut from a charge? I know logs very so much but a rough guide 

Expect approx. 0,9 sqm of cut area per 100Wh of battery with a well made saw and a sharp chain.

This means for example 2x18Vx5Ah batteries should be capable of ~160 cuts of 10x10cm square sticks (that’s 4x4” in royal units).

Obviously results may vary if you overload a weak chainsaw or run a powerful one with not much load. In both cases there are additional energy losses.

Edited by Piston Skirt
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The battery Makita is a great saw, and relatively powerful too. I got mine because I have more Makita tools.  Rear handled saws are readily available in this range, not just climbing saws.  Make sure the chain is sharp, because that really saps the battery power, and I'd recommend a 12" chain, no longer. Also, you will need spare batteries, and a twin charger, unless you like having long tea breaks. The best deal anywhere is at Screwfix. 4x5ah batteries, and a twin charger for £279. 

 

Now it may or may not help you, but don't discount the 240v saws, ie cabled. I have an old one, and it's amazing. Easier than starting a petrol, but a length of cable to deal with. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter have you tried the bigger saws? I'm tempted by a 16" but won't bother if it's too much for it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the MSA 220 with 2 300s bats & the longer bar.

 

When processing its used to de limb / cut flares ect off & the odd ring to get rid of ends that are too big. For that job its rare we will flatten both bats unless doing lots of rings.

 

Doing big rings eats the bats as they heat up & then self protect.

 

I have used it for felling & dealing with felled trees.

 

For that work you really need 3+ bats to work non stop. I like that after two I have to take a short break to let them catch up.

 

One thing I found was that you need to keep chain sharp & let the chain do the work keeping the feed pressure light so chain speed stays high. Dont force it into the wood.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Justme said:

I have the MSA 220 with 2 300s bats & the longer bar.

 

When processing its used to de limb / cut flares ect off & the odd ring to get rid of ends that are too big. For that job its rare we will flatten both bats unless doing lots of rings.

 

Doing big rings eats the bats as they heat up & then self protect.

 

I have used it for felling & dealing with felled trees.

 

For that work you really need 3+ bats to work non stop. I like that after two I have to take a short break to let them catch up.

 

One thing I found was that you need to keep chain sharp & let the chain do the work keeping the feed pressure light so chain speed stays high. Dont force it into the wood.

Heat is the enemy of batteries. If I run my saw hard and stick the batteries straight on charge as they flatten, they refuse to charge, being too hot. Have to let them cool first. Absolutely correct about sharp chains and light pressure. It's only a battery saw after all. 

1 hour ago, JT19 said:

Peter have you tried the bigger saws? I'm tempted by a 16" but won't bother if it's too much for it.

 

If I'm using a 16" bar, there's either a Stihl 038 turning it, or a mains powered saw.  Stihl/Husky/Echo electric saws are capable of running bigger bars than mine, but that's Pro gear. I have three Makita battery drills, one has a side handle about a foot long, and needs it. One has a six inch handle, and one has no side handle. As you might guess, I don't put huge great drill bits in the one with no handle, it's not designed to turn them. Horses for courses. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Peter 1955 said:

Heat is the enemy of batteries. If I run my saw hard and stick the batteries straight on charge as they flatten, they refuse to charge, being too hot. Have to let them cool first.

The sthil will run a cool down cycle before charging a hot battery or a heat up one on a cold bat.

 

Then after charging it runs a second cool down cycle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Featured Adverts

  • Tip site reviews

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.