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Eucalyptus

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3 hours ago, gobbypunk said:

I have seen nice big slab tables made from it but on an tv program from the US dont know if it would be a diffrent type ,if it was me I would be tempted to mill a few 4/6 inch slabs strap them up and see what happens even if it cracks badly it could be used for resin tables

might be worth trying a few bits cut through the pith and avoid any that don't have radial faces, thin stickers and plenty of weight on top.

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25 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

might be worth trying a few bits cut through the pith and avoid any that don't have radial faces, thin stickers and plenty of weight on top.

Useful, thanks. It could be a case of only getting 3 cuts from it then, one through the centre and one either side, as thick as possible. All the rest of the trim could be pressed into service (ho ho) as the weight on top. If, at the very least, I only get a warped and wavy garden table out of it, I'd be thrilled, because the tree is right next to where that table would be. Shame it has to come out at all, really. 

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1 hour ago, peds said:

Useful, thanks. It could be a case of only getting 3 cuts from it then, one through the centre and one either side, as thick as possible. All the rest of the trim could be pressed into service (ho ho) as the weight on top. If, at the very least, I only get a warped and wavy garden table out of it, I'd be thrilled, because the tree is right next to where that table would be. Shame it has to come out at all, really. 

The thicker you cut it the more stress the non radial surface will exert as its face tries to cup. I am assuming the gumtree will have a high tangential to radial shrinkage. There's nothing you can do about that but evenly drying  throughout minimises differential shrinkage as the moisture drops below 25% on the outer parts while the inside is still moister.

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All good information, thanks for your advice. I'll upload a couple of pictures when I get round to knocking it over, if anyone wants to follow the process, if I end up doing anything with it.

From what I can gather, being on the West Coast of Ireland might work in my favour here, as our lovely moist air means things are pretty slow to dry out. 

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From my understanding there are well over 100 types of eucalyptus and some a extremely durable fine timber and others are only fit for burning. 

 It might be worth doing a bit more research to find out what you have got. 

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Eucalyptus is a very much used wood in Australia amd New Zealand. The former i am guessing has a hotter climate and I've not seen many bitching about the quality of the lumber they produce. There is several fb milling pages and a fair amount of Australian guys. Also have a look on the peterson milling fb page they mill tons of the stuff.

I milled some last year and they cupped a bit but interesting grain patterns.

20201109_115812.jpg

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2 hours ago, Big Beech said:

Eucalyptus is a very much used wood in Australia amd New Zealand. The former i am guessing has a hotter climate and I've not seen many bitching about the quality of the lumber they produce. There is several fb milling pages and a fair amount of Australian guys. Also have a look on the peterson milling fb page they mill tons of the stuff.

I milled some last year and they cupped a bit but interesting grain patterns.

20201109_115812.jpg

Do you think if you left it longer in length so you had some wastage for end splitting it would be better? Did you paint the ends? 

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37 minutes ago, Paddy1000111 said:

Do you think if you left it longer in length so you had some wastage for end splitting it would be better? Did you paint the ends? 

It was the lenghts it was cut and felled some time ago.

I milled it out of curiosity as I was there poking at the yard.

I sold 2 boards for £60 to a chap as outdoor shelves for his lockdown man cave.

The radial splitting on the other bit were impressive, so took.off a load of 4" slices and threw those in the greenhouse all last summer.

Sold 6 at £12 for resin and the turning fraternity 👍

Screenshot_20210117-181019_Facebook.jpg

Edited by Big Beech
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2 minutes ago, Big Beech said:

It was the lenghts it was cut and felled some time ago.

I milled it out of curiosity as I was there poking at the yard.

I sold 2 boards for £60 to a chap as outdoor shelves for his lockdown man cave.

The radial splitting on the other bit were impressive, so took.off a load of 4" slices and threw those in the greenhouse all last summer.

Sold 6 at £12 for resin and the turning fraternity 👍

Nice one! I was just curious as I'm only just getting into milling and trying to learn how to make things work! 

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