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tomsrmc

Inherited some trees

Question

Hi all,

I've moved into a new house with some small trees in the back garden. I'm completely clueless so would like to ask for some basic advice.

image.png.a2a78acbf56e0951dd341ae5c9b7cce3.png
 

 

They're growing around supports, so I wonder if they were meant to be pleached together? Or are they too separate for this?
I assume the aim was to provide privacy from the numerous neighbours.

Could you please identify them from these photos? Maybe Hornbeams?

image.png.b85e9281fd04962cd3ca8719b969e90f.png
image.png.1311be5cfa7528c0e3ce33b9b06260f7.png


This seems like an overly forceful way of guiding branches.. Is it bad practice to twist them in any direction like this?

image.png.16101c8d851c780264a82e1e5a9ac25c.png

How would they be maintained from here? Would it be a good idea to have the tops cut off just above the height of the support, and would this encourage sideways growth?

Is it possible to prevent the main trunks from becoming too much bigger in future years? I assume these things would get pretty enormous if left unchecked.

Many thanks!
Tom

 

Edited by tomsrmc

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They are pleached trees, a read here will give you some idea

WWW.RHS.ORG.UK

Pleaching is a method of training trees to produce a narrow screen or hedge by tying in and interlacing flexible young shoots along a supporting framework. Use this technique to make...

They could well be hornbeam from the pics but I won’t commit to it, assuming they are as hornbeam is often used for pleached trees.
You can not stop the trunk growing but if they are hornbeam they will be relatively slow growing

 

i would of planted them closer together to form a hedge like screen but they could of been planted to screen certain windows 

Edited by Will C

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Yes somewhat pleached and potentially not had any work on them since they were planted by the initial look at the photos. 

 

The image below gives you an idea of what one would probably want to go for. Does look like Hornbeam from the photos. 

_DSC9568.jpg

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Looks like hornbeam

 

Hornbeam actually pretty   fast growing the ones iv'e planted grow a few ft a yr anyway.

 

 

Looks like  newly planted trees and a new  build house which sometimes have poor amount of topsoil which trees  don't like. Will benefit from watering in summer if it is a dry one especially, for few yrs until there roots established and maybe extra mulch...

 

If you are keen  worth erecting some posts &  put a better framwork up, to  train the laterals...

 

2014-02-006.jpg

 

 

Edited by Stere
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4 minutes ago, Steve Bullman said:

This is the goal long term, one of the best examples move seen 

 

 

CE4068CF-BBF6-420C-BCC1-FCB1F5418A8A.jpeg

3104BABE-AF7E-468F-93EF-E33D668440EB.jpeg

A98D2FCE-6C26-468A-8730-C66A40EFD778.jpeg

8FD0F7F2-2391-4609-AB82-59C2A26E14AF.jpeg

Thems are gorgeous old things. 

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Thanks for the tips!
It is a relatively new build, so will make sure they're well watered as you advise.

As the top branches are already quite high (with no clear leader on most).. Would it be best to trim these down or try to gradually train them sideways?

I've read that once they've reached their final height it's OK to trim outside of winter months.. would you agree?

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1 hour ago, tomsrmc said:

Thanks for the tips!
It is a relatively new build, so will make sure they're well watered as you advise.

As the top branches are already quite high (with no clear leader on most).. Would it be best to trim these down or try to gradually train them sideways?

I've read that once they've reached their final height it's OK to trim outside of winter months.. would you agree?

Yes. Trim/cut the tops down to the top of the pleacher frame. Let the trees divert their energy to the side growth not top growth. Tie in as the side shoots develop following the outline of the pleach frames. 

Hornbeam is pretty resilient, you can cut back as and when you need to get the shape you desire, so not necessary to wait until winter when it is dormant. If you've got a sharp pair of secateurs handy and are self isolating at home at the moment, now is a good time ?

 

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