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Dangerous tree on neighbour's property

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Still no pics of the prunus...but I f it stayed up after yesterday’s wind. Then no need to worry so much about ya granny..

 

in the meantime why didn’t you raise it with the old guy and his misses or was it that he had dementia..

 

the new owners could get it felled if they were to think it was a risk...if you open your mouth..

 but in the meantime, a guy turns up from the local park and will be moving on when he get a section (whatever) notice in a week or twos time. anyhow he  fells it and get paids ...

 

well that hat was my stormy nites dream last nite.. I don’t know what yours was..😂😂😂😂

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If the property is in receivership, the property is owned by the receiver, albeit they will be trying to get rid off it for a profit , therefore as the owner is 'known', the LPA are very unlikely to deal with it under the local government (miscellaneous provisons) Act, as that would be spending local tax payers money on a privately owned 'asset' .

Notify the 'owner', if known , post letter of your concerns through the letter box and copy to LPA.

Check your own insurance that you are covered for 'tree damage'  and provide them with the details of the property they will then advise you on how to best proceed in regards protecting your asset.

Monitor the lean without trespassing, by photographs so you have some evidence (or not) of progressive movement.

Your concern re tree and foundations is different to 'tree falling risk'. 

 

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On 07/12/2019 at 14:19, sbyorkshire said:

If the property is in receivership, the property is owned by the receiver, albeit they will be trying to get rid off it for a profit , therefore as the owner is 'known', the LPA are very unlikely to deal with it under the local government (miscellaneous provisons) Act, as that would be spending local tax payers money on a privately owned 'asset'

The Receiver doesn't own the property. They manage the assets of the person in receivership.

 

Ownership is irrelevant. The Council can serve notice whether or not the owner is known. Whatever money they spend they can get back by placing a charge against the property, so cost to the Council Tax payer doesn't come into it.

 

It's just a matter of whether they want, or need, to act or not.

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7 minutes ago, monkeybusiness said:

That was quick - are you sure it isn’t just winter?!...

That was my thoughts as well. !!!

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