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Mick Dempsey

The who can get most outraged at bad treework thread.

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12 hours ago, Mick Dempsey said:

What do you mean by “butt cuts”?

Another term sometimes used is 'truncated', meaning inter-nodal cuts, i.e. between nodes / buds / "suitable secondary growth points, often resulting in multiple regrowth points from dormant buds, i.e. reaction growth.

 

The other term mention was 'panic regrowth' which, IME, is not necessarily associated with 'excessive' pruning as often occurs when trees are stressed, maybe resultant from root damage/severance, but results in dormant buds along branches being stimulated to grow as 'last gasp' to survive (is how I think I've heard it described.)

 

Paul

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6 minutes ago, AA Teccie (Paul) said:

Another term sometimes used is 'truncated', meaning inter-nodal cuts, i.e. between nodes / buds / "suitable secondary growth points, often resulting in multiple regrowth points from dormant buds, i.e. reaction growth.

 

The other term mention was 'panic regrowth' which, IME, is not necessarily associated with 'excessive' pruning as often occurs when trees are stressed, maybe resultant from root damage/severance, but results in dormant buds along branches being stimulated to grow as 'last gasp' to survive (is how I think I've heard it described.)

 

Paul

So...stressing the tree then . Which I would like to avoid in my work. K

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1 hour ago, tree-fancier123 said:

tree 'work' should include specifying and planting the street trees. Surely there are better options these days that don't need bits sawn off regular.

Yea, it's called formative pruning mate. So the tree you want ends up as the tree you get. A mythical and esoteric practise way beyond Local Authority ken. K

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49 minutes ago, Khriss said:

Yea, it's called formative pruning mate. So the tree you want ends up as the tree you get. A mythical and esoteric practise way beyond Local Authority ken. K

What I was getting at is plane (and lime) seem very expensive street trees that will always require periodic removal of new growth. Why not use other species that aren't going to need cutting so much? Hardly anywhere has room for a mature lime or plane.

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3 minutes ago, tree-fancier123 said:

What I was getting at is plane (and lime) seem very expensive street trees that will always require periodic removal of new growth. Why not use other species that aren't going to need cutting so much? Hardly anywhere has room for a mature lime or plane.

Basically those species are pollution resistant and old school . Cherry spp are same. Nothing wrong with any tree spp as long as it gets the right care. K

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Huge Epicormic growth often erupts when tree has been hammered - sorry, pruned, as it has to feed itself ! Then becomes a huge yearly cost to maintain. K

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tree 'work' should include specifying and planting the street trees. Surely there are better options these days that don't need bits sawn off regular.

Bolam had me pissing myself a few weeks ago when he posted about the poor quality of new build houses.
“At least you get a nice new eucalyptus on the front lawn though.”
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21 minutes ago, Khriss said:

Huge Epicormic growth often erupts when tree has been hammered - sorry, pruned, as it has to feed itself ! Then becomes a

24 minutes ago, Khriss said:

Basically those species are pollution resistant and old school . Cherry spp are same. Nothing wrong with any tree spp as long as it gets the right care. K

Black popular could be a good street tree with the right care?

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49 minutes ago, tree-fancier123 said:

 

Nowt wrong with Poplar in right place. Good shade n fast growth. I had the idea rolling around in my head fr years that planting trees in volume in urban areas was way beneficial if maintained by educated staff. Slowly weeding out overmature or hazard trees to be replaced by trees that prune well . Most of the Public think Large Tree = Dangerous Tree so maintaining trees at a nominal height that is easy to prune from a bucket truck or the like, will allow volume planting ( in the right soils and location ) then leave yr specimen and large trees for yr parks n garden locations. K

Edited by Khriss
Is why Napoleon planted thousands of Lombardy especially to shade his marching troops.

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