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Found this on willow that is clearly dying! Any ideas?

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I'd say ganoderma too, either australe or applanatum. The redness on the trunk looks like spores.

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Hard (perennial type) or soft (annual type)

 

if the latter I'd suggest Ganoderma resinaceum.

 

Looks like this years fruiting body growing below last years.

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whats the best way to learn all of the different fungi and their qualities/effects on trees? I have seen very similar on some of our beech trees and thought it looked like australe.  Obviously there are  different ones that are similar. 😜

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15 hours ago, AJStrees said:

whats the best way to learn all of the different fungi and their qualities/effects on trees? I have seen very similar on some of our beech trees and thought it looked like australe.  Obviously there are  different ones that are similar. 😜

Arb Associations Fungi on Trees is a good start, though limited to the 25 principal most commonly found species. Buy a general fubgi Id book (Jordan, Phillips, etc....) Join the British Mycological Society. Find your nearest local mycology group and go out on forays. Visit different woodland sites than your used to to find more unusual species. Build your own digital reference resource with species specific folders. Look at and catalogue tree failures you come across at work and other sites. Fungi identification is a long but very interesting road. 

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12 minutes ago, David Humphries said:

Arb Associations Fungi on Trees is a good start, though limited to the 25 principal most commonly found species. Buy a general fubgi Id book (Jordan, Phillips, etc....) Join the British Mycological Society. Find your nearest local mycology group and go out on forays. Visit different woodland sites than your used to to find more unusual species. Build your own digital reference resource with species specific folders. Look at and catalogue tree failures you come across at work and other sites. Fungi identification is a long but very interesting road. 

That's excellent direction. Thank you David. Ok will work on it. Its always down to being able to spend the time on these things. Though hugely interesting, doing this in between being out on the grounds does make it a bit of a challenge. 

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