Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Pete Mctree

Growth anomaly on ash trees

Recommended Posts

I was re-reducing 5 massively over pruned Ash trees on Friday, when I began to notice some unusual growth like you can see in the images below. The other unusual growth habit was the massive annual growth- epicormic shoots of over 2m in length in 2 growing seasons.

i have seen this before , years ago & always wondered what the root cause was. Any ideas?

IMG_0684.JPG

IMG_0687.JPG

IMG_0689.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Pete Mctree said:

I was re-reducing 5 massively over pruned Ash trees on Friday, when I began to notice some unusual growth like you can see in the images below. The other unusual growth habit was the massive annual growth- epicormic shoots of over 2m in length in 2 growing seasons.

i have seen this before , years ago & always wondered what the root cause was. Any ideas?

IMG_0684.JPG

IMG_0687.JPG

IMG_0689.JPG

Fasciation, its when the  meristematic cells divide wrongly, maybe as a result of excess plant hormones though in the past it often was from a whiff of 245t, a man made plant hormone mimic.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Pete Mctree said:

Is it an infection? All the trees bar one displayed the growth habit

I don't know if it can be caused by an infection but if a number have the  signs I would suspect a growth regulator of some sort had been used nearby.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect this fasciation is caused by a bacterium or fungal most likely former, ash are particularly prone as is forsythia. I once saw a foxglove with it and the flower head was a sight to behold! No chemicals need be implicated at all. Perfectly natural, harmless and actualy on flowering species quite stunning at times

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like phyllody, flowers become excessive vegetative growth. Caused by viral infections. Also happens in strawberries,clover and garden flowers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/3/2017 at 06:59, Tony Croft aka hamadryad said:

....... Perfectly natural, harmless and actualy on flowering species quite stunning at times

Agreed

 

IMG_1043.thumb.JPG.793f3a150bba55fe54a963cec4c6c267.JPG

 

https://arbtalk.co.uk/forums/topic/54051-can-anyone-identify-the-cause-of-these-deformities/

 

 

.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.