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  • josharb87

    Review: Husqvarna Universal Axe A2400

    CONs:
    • Perhaps not the "green" choice?

    Husqvarna Universal Axe A2400

     

    I think its important to explain that i actually preferred wooden axes, hand made, theres something about a quality wooden axe that can’t be described.

     

    Unfortunately, wooden axes don’t lend themselves too well to arborist treatment, they’re not designed for hitting wedges, not just hitting wedges but really smacking them in hard, They're not normally designed for splitting knotty arb waste, the strength in the wooden handles varies, some wooden handles have lasted me a year or more, others a week.

     

    So i decided to get one of these husqvarna axes, specifically, the A2400 with its composite, fiber re-inforced, 70cm shaft (Plastic to me!) Soft grip areas and heavy head (2400 = 2.4kg) with a non stick coating its proved to be extremely durable with the abuse I've given it - hitting in felling wedges, splitting gnarly wood, in fact, id go as far to say as its the best splitting axe I’ve used!

     

    They come with a really good plastic cover for the axe head, should you need it - quite important as its sharp when new, and really holds the edge well.

    It feels like theres less vibrations passed to your hands when abusing it, although this view isn’t backed up with any facts, but important to consider.

     

    Cost wise this series of axe starts at £35rrp for the hatchet up to £65,50rrp for this or the S2800 splitting axe. This is similar pricing to your average wooden handle axe, but long term far cheaper. Pricing is also significantly cheaper than Husqvarnas wooden handled axes.


    This also makes this professional grade product affordable to the home owner in my opinion.

     

    Axes in this Husqvarna Axe series:


    Universal Hatchet 900B
    Universal axe A1400
    Universal axe A2400
    Splitting axe S1600
    Splitting axe S2800

     

    I'll be rating this axe at 4/5, Its biggest asset - the plastic shaft, is also loosing it a point, in an age where plastic is starting to become demonised, its important in my opinion that Husqvarna look for a "greener" plastic.

     

    H410-0896.png.c014b86d259a6dbf1c1f44aadcf8b1a8.png



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    I've tried implements with man made handles and I've always been put off because of the 'shock' that is transmitted through the shaft compared to a wooden handle.

    In your opinion is this worse, comparable or better to a wooden shaft for not transferring the impact?

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    I keep thinking of buying a splitting axe or maul. I have an old 8lb maul with a hickory handle my dad gave me. Had it for a decade and split 10 to 15t a year with it. It won't die....will I really notice an improvement with this or a x27?

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    1 minute ago, billpierce said:

    I keep thinking of buying a splitting axe or maul. I have an old 8lb maul with a hickory handle my dad gave me. Had it for a decade and split 10 to 15t a year with it. It won't die....will I really notice an improvement with this or a x27?

    I really rate my x27.  I have mauls and axes and the x27 is my chopper of choice.

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    4 hours ago, Wendelspanswick said:

    I've tried implements with man made handles and I've always been put off because of the 'shock' that is transmitted through the shaft compared to a wooden handle.

    In your opinion is this worse, comparable or better to a wooden shaft for not transferring the impact?

    I cannot stand using a wooden handled splitting tool now I have been using the plastic handled x21 and x27 for a year or two. 

    Apart from a manky old hatchet for roots I only have fiskars axes now. 

    As for their splitting ability, since buying them I have sold both my log splitters, so that must say something! 

    I have used the husqvarna axes and definitely preferred them to wooden axes but nowhere near as. Good as my fiskars. 

    Although the husqvarnas look like they would be better for bashing wedges, if that's important to you.

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    I also use a Husqvarna splitting axe, the S2800; and have to say that in terms of function and durability, its the best I've had. A Hultafors job I had previously was great aside from the top of the handle now having been smashed half way through, in no time. Wood might absorb shock better, but with a few miss-strikes it won't last long, I reckon

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    Have had a standard 8lb splitting maul for last 10 years. Just got an x27 for Christmas and can confirm how good they are. Very significantly better at splitting than anything I have used to date.

    Time will tell how they last but so far very impressed

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    I have the baby of the range, the 900b. It's got a 700g head (900g overall) and is 34cm long and I love it. coming ready-to-use sharp is a nice touch. It's got some good weight to it, but isn't so long that it feels uncomfortable if you have it attached to you when not in use. the one thing i'm not sold on is the grip. it feels a bit slippery if using it one handed (which with the 900, you will be!). other than that it's a great piece of kit. 

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    Ive split one of these husqvarna axes in half from just banging wedges(plastic) as the poll and axe are held together by some dubious fixing which is cleverly hidden by the rest of the handle. Great weight and size though

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    I love axes, I have about 10, I much prefer wooden handled ones, Gransfors, Hultifors etc, but I've had the biggest of the husky ones for about 4 years and it's been great, I mostly use it in forestry operations, often for pounding hi lifts in, but it's good for doing big rounds and its been thrown around a lot n I've never had a prob from shock in the handle.

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