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madbopper

Straining wire fencing

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Hi all

I have just had 2 quotes to install a large chunk of fencing around a lake I manage both prices were very much the same but the 2 lads had different views on construction.

Lad 1) said straining posts every 50m and strain from one end and staple and tie off.

Lad 2) said straining posts at 100 m and tie off both ends and pull up tension from the Middle.

 

The wire comes in 50 m rolls and is 1.4 m high, high tensile otter fence from tornado.

How would you like to see it done.

Cheers Russ.

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Hi all

I have just had 2 quotes to install a large chunk of fencing around a lake I manage both prices were very much the same but the 2 lads had different views on construction.

Lad 1) said straining posts every 50m and strain from one end and staple and tie off.

Lad 2) said straining posts at 100 m and tie off both ends and pull up tension from the Middle.

 

The wire comes in 50 m rolls and is 1.4 m high, high tensile otter fence from tornado.

How would you like to see it done.

Cheers Russ.

 

 

I don't know, never even seen otter fence and only dead otters in the wild. Tensioning at the joint between two rolls seems sensible . Stapling off at the post isn't wise, use twists or clips instead.

 

If it's high tensile then 100m between posts is fine, the reason for the lower length for ordinary wire (and this isn't very pertinent with stock fence) is that the strain can exceed the elastic limit of the wire, an animal leaning on it will then cause it to go slack as any further tension is in the plastic region.

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Hi all

I have just had 2 quotes to install a large chunk of fencing around a lake I manage both prices were very much the same but the 2 lads had different views on construction.

Lad 1) said straining posts every 50m and strain from one end and staple and tie off.

Lad 2) said straining posts at 100 m and tie off both ends and pull up tension from the Middle.

 

The wire comes in 50 m rolls and is 1.4 m high, high tensile otter fence from tornado.

How would you like to see it done.

Cheers Russ.

 

I would be looking to contact 2 or 3 Agricultural fencing businesses and ask to see their work. If you know little about fencing, take someone with you who does! Then get quotes from who you see as the most proficient.

 

Professional fencing contractors usually have the best, most efficient gear and are the most competitive for those reasons.

 

Fencing other than gentle curves has many pitfalls when constructing stock fencing e.g. uprating stake diameter to 5-6" top etc. etc. - otter fencing may be different (if only for otters) as you are not securing huge beasts.

 

Good luck.

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I liked the strain from the Middle option the lad said he would tension using fence strainers and then secure using gripples as any tension can be adjusted at a later date if needed.

I was just unsure whether 100 m was a long way between strainers.

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I would agree with 'lad 2' strain in the middle- gets a nice even pull from both ends. I would say that if the prices are the same lad 2 will be making more profit- less strainers and less labour. with hi ensile long srains tend to be better anyway- more elasticity throughout the length.

 

IMO stapling off tensioned wire like lad 1 is a bad idea- it crimps the wire and damages the galvanising in the process.

 

just my thoughts. Also see what specs they have for strainer assemblies- for 1.4 meter high id be going for box strainers myself.

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Using ht wire strains of up to a mile can be achieved easily on straight pulls on level ground.strainer spacing should be dictated not by distance but by ground conditions ie if a curve many tuning posts will be needed and if undulating you will need either hold down posts or hold up posts neat placement of posts at a set distance is not good practice

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